Opt out or left out?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Opt out or left out?
430
Mon, 05-13-2013 - 3:31pm

This article says that most SAH moms do so, because they can't afford to work (i.e. couldn't make enough to cover their childcare costs).  Or that their husband's income is in the top 5% of earners in the US.  So SAHMs are at the two extreme ends of income.  This seems to me to be pretty much what we've found through discussions on this board.  Do you think that there should be programs in place to make it easier for SAHMs in the lower income brackets to go back to work?  How could this be accomplished?

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/opt-out-or-left-out-economics-stay-home-moms-1C9881635

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 1:58pm

Interesting logic considering you defend folks who borrow more mortgage than they can afford to begin with.  You know, those mortgage broker scams and all. 

Yeah, what about the ones who have family members on their mortgage too. Probably because they can't get a mortgage on their own. That really stinks. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 1:59pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Yeah. I'm sick and tired of paying higher taxes to subsidize all the people out there who get a mortgage deduction. Why should I have to pay for your inability to pay cash for your house?</span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="text-align:left">That's the negative thing about owing your home outright <img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-laughing.gif" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" border="0" /></span></strong></span></p>

Yea, Tax breaks on the interest is a +.  And she had a mortgage at one time, What a weird statement. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:00pm

I'm surprised Spring, most anti-welfare people promote leaning on extended family to provide for those who can't as an alternative to using the welfare system. What do you think should happen to the children that exist outside of your planning, then? Should their families simply suffer? Maybe the children from the original article should be living in some kind of homeless shelter instead of relying on the kindness of the landlord aunt?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:01pm

<<I got that but she could have gotten a FULL time job as she was only going to work PART time. What about part time when her dh could watch the kids? Nights? Weekends? It seems she was fine taking hand outs from her family then doing that. >>

No, I don't think you do, at least you haven't shown that you gleaned the point from the article based on your posts.  How do you know that she could have gotten a full time job in the rural area that she lives?  Either way, it's a simple math equation, one needs to make so much to cover expenses.  

So again....what do you have against programs that help people go back to work?  Clearly you can see the benefits to yourself of more people in the working force, right?


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:02pm

I don't see how the children in the article were suffering. I wouldn't even see a family helping out another family member through a rough patch as children suffering.  What you can't seem to comprehend outside of your very narrow view is that people plan, sometimes things don't go according to plan and harping about said plan doesn't change the fact that the plan needs to change.  Broaden that narrow view a bit.

Believe me, my view is VERY WIDE. Did I ever say that my "plan" has ever gone 100%? Does anyone's? lol. I do know that I would do EVERYTHING in my power to NOT rely on anyone as much as I possibly could. From what we read in this story, I don't think this family has. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:02pm

<Interesting logic considering you defend folks who borrow more mortgage than they can afford to begin with.  You know, those mortgage broker scams and all.>

Interesting bit of ignorance, here. A mortgage broker offers a professional service. Some are excellent, some are not. I foundd an excellent service provider who got me a rate that enabled me to pay off my home years earlier than we had planned. No scam, no skimming and points better than any commercial bank or credit union.Yes, we did due dilegence before carrying through on the transaction.

When did I defend you defend folks who borrow more mortgage than they can afford?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:03pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">All kinds.</span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="text-align:left">That's nice. I am sure there are many families out there they get "all kinds" of support from their families. Many don't ask or get themselves in a bad situation though to GET that support. </span></strong></span></p>

Why are you all bent out of shape over this family getting help from their family.  You "think" the extended family "might" be doing this unwillingly & it's not fair to them.  Ummm you don't know either way.  I'm pretty sure that there was not crime committed to obtain money from extended family (no gun held to someone's head) because the article didn't mention that.  You don't know one way or the other the feelings of the givers you just think they shouldn't even ask because it's not fair.  They are grownups and they can decide if they want to do this.  You also say not everyone has family they can ask.  Yes, so?  Some do and some get help from their family and some don't.  That's life, it's not fair--those other families get by in a myriad of other ways.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:03pm

Yea, I got it the first time, it doesn't work for everyone but you suddenly claim that it does when I mention something different.  

Nope, I said EVERYONE can apply is what I said. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:07pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Interesting logic considering you defend folks who borrow more mortgage than they can afford to begin with.  You know, those mortgage broker scams and all. </span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="text-align:left">Yeah, what about the ones who have family members on their mortgage too. Probably because they can't get a mortgage on their own. That really stinks. </span></strong></span></p>

And if someone has a family member on their mortgage so they can get a bigger loan on their house than their credit would allow--so what?  Does it harm anyone else in any way?  I'm not advocating that any adults do that, but seriously, how does "that really stink?"  Just because you weren't able to do that?  You have mentioned in the past that your family has helped you out by giving you things or paying for things.  Why do you feel so negatively about anyone else getting similar help?

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 05-14-2013 - 2:07pm

I don't see where they are "struggling so bad", where was that in the article?

<<Programs that help people go back to work, why is that a problem with you?

I answered this already. >>

No, not really...you have diverted to how does it benefit you (which I clearly explained), you diverted it to people on their couches not working (which I explained was not the case), to disabilities (which again, was not the case) and lots of other diversions but you never answered the question.  And no, it's not sad that I didn't like your non answer, lol....

Really, there is nothing wrong with programs that help people go back to work.

PumpkinAngel

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