Poor nutrition sah/woh issue?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Poor nutrition sah/woh issue?
1167
Tue, 12-29-2009 - 7:24pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 6:35am
Plus, it makes me question their intellligence. I mean cooking was invented by people who couldn't read, write, do math, and who were easily scared by the moon in its various phases.

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Kitty

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Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 7:21am
I know cooking is not rocket science. Even though I have three DDs I have to admit that I did not spend a much time teaching them the basic skills of cooking. Yet they all do have cooking skills to varying degrees. Just like anything else once the desire to do something is the there you pick up the skills needed to accomplish the goal.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-27-2007
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 7:41am
LOL. My DH is a chef and the phases of the moon still affect him.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 10:18am
LOL, well, I wasn't trying to make a commentary on the intelligence of chefs so much as an observation that rudimentary cookings skills are practically impossible to avoid.

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Kitty

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Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 10:46am

Even if all the kids do is "help" in the kitchen at a young age, they grow up with the concept of cooking. And that is something that I think got lost between my mom's generation and Joy's generation. And I'm not sure how. Somewhere, my generation dropped the ball on a lot of basics like cooking.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 11:38am

Another thought--the schools have dropped cooking from the curriculum. When I was in jr. high (middle school for the younger generation, grades 7-9), the girls had to take a semester of cooking and a semester of sewing in 7th grade. Nutrition, meal planning, reading recipes were all taught. For the grades after that, they were electives. Sometime between the 60s and the 90s when Joy went to high school, they went co-ed and then were dropped from the curriculum.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 1:54pm
When I went to school the class was coed. Typically Danish, instead of dropping the class, they made shop, sewing and cooking compulsory for both sexes.

~~~~~ o o o ~~~~

Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.

Oscar Wilde

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 5:33pm

I don't think that my mom really liked to cook, it was just a chore that needed to be done. So she was not only glad for any help that she could get from us but I since I liked cooking I actually took over a lot of the cooking chores (cooking dinner etc) from about 12 years old.

On the other hand since I do like cooking and being an introvert like to work alone my kids did not spend a lot of time helping me in the kitchen. The only thing that we ever really did as a group project was making Christmas cookies.

But they did take over preparing their own breakfast and lunches by the end of elementary school so a lot of what they did learn was hands on learning. How much they learned was really dependent on them. My most adventurous one would think of what she wanted to eat and seek out the recipe to make it happen. My less adventurous ones stuck mainly to what could be reheated in the microwave/oven.

But even that has changed over time and one of my queens of the microwave has become quite the cook over the last few years. She made a great sweet potato pie for Christmas.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 5:48pm

Yep. When I was in middle school both in 7th and 8th grade girls took a semester of sewing and a semester of cooking. Boys took a semester of wood shop and a semester of metal shop in both 7th grade and 8th grade.

My brother was three years behind me and when he hit 7th/8th grade both boys and girls took one semester of sewing, one of cooking, one of metal shop and one of wood shop in those two grades.

DD2 had as an elective sewing and cooking in 6st grade (I think either 6 or 8 weeks of each), but I do not think that it was even an option for her sisters and the middle schools they attended.

So their sewing skills have have kind of mirrored their cooking skills it has depended on what they have seeked out. DD1 has had absolutely no interest in sewing, DD2 knows the basic skills she learned in that class. DD3 on the other had asked for a sewing machine for her birthday a few years ago and is quite crafty (she made curtains fro both her college dorm and the apartment she now lives in).

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-31-2009
Thu, 12-31-2009 - 6:29pm
I don't think only a "subset of younger women" don't cook as some as yourself see fit. I don't think it is an age thing but an interest in it all together.

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