***Quantity Time***

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
***Quantity Time***
15
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 7:09pm
Why is quantity time almost a bad word in the language of parents?

Are there are any benefits from quantity time?

What do the studies/research say?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 8:10pm
Well, I for one, don't give a fig what the studies/researchers say.

And I don't think its that "quantity time" is a bad term, as much as "quality time" is a good term.

Personally, I don't think its the quantity or quality that matters; its involvement. Invovlement can be direct (i.e. quality time) or indirect. A parent can be very involved without spending much quantity time. A parent can also be involved by spending that quantity time.

And I don't think quanityt time and quality time are mutually exclusive. And I think you have to have a certain degree of both to be a quality parent.

I don't know if you "get" this from my post ... but there's my $.02.

Hollie

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2003
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 8:19pm
It isn't a bad word in my book. Certainly there are benefits to quantity time. IMO, quantity time is time spent on general caregiving and routine daily activities such as bathtime, helping with homework, preparing meals together, doing household chores as a team, etc. While these activities are generally less exciting than quality time activities, I definately think they have their place. I think the biggest benefit to having quantity time, in addition to quality time is, that it gives you MORE time to spend on quality activities. In other words, you don't have to use your quality time cooking dinner. IMO, quality time means one-on-one interaction such as: reading books, playing a game, working a puzzle, or eating dinner as a family. Quality time doesn't involve chores, it's time spent on something fun and meaningful. Here's an article that deals with research on the subject. Good questions!!!

http://nuforfamilies.unl.edu/Time/Family/TTLrnHome.htm

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-31-2003
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 8:30pm
I like the way you contrasted "quantity time" and indirect time vs. "quality time" and direct time. I think that is a very good way to distiquish between the two. IMO, I think it is ideal to have A LOT of both. I honestly feel that the quality of my "quality time" is greatly influenced and improved by the the fact that I also have an ample amount of "quantity time". But that's just me.
Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 8:51pm
Define quantity time? Most of the time? All the time? Over 50 hours per week? I don't think anyone will argue that quantity time isn't important but you're likely to get lots of different views on just what is quantity time. IMO, me spending 65% of my kids waking time with them is quantity time. That's a lot of time.

The closest I can get to a study on quantity time is the study on maternal sensitivity that found that when mom was sensitive to her baby's needs, her working status didn't matter, the flip side being, when mom was insensitive, it did matter.

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 9:00pm
But what constitutes having "quantity" time? Can you have quantity time and WOH? I think you can. To me, quantity time is having enough more time than I need so that time is not an issue. I think the extra time enhances comfort (for lack of a better term) levels between people but I don't think you need to spend all your time together. I think there comes a point where more time is just more time but I think there is a such thing as having too little time too. I don't believe we, particularly, benefit from spending all of our time with anyone, including our kids.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-2003
Tue, 04-15-2003 - 10:21pm
Thanks. We do MANY of the things on the list in the article. We have PLENTY of quantity time. On weeks that i work (only 40 weeks per year = 181 days) I average 50+ HOURS per week with the kids. There are 184 days that I don't work and get JUST THE SAME AMOUNT OF TIME AS YOU. In fact, on the "whole" i have one day off per year for every day that i work.....

Thanks again for the article. But honestly, it's nothing that wohps don't already know -- We're way ahead of you on that one.

Eileen

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 04-16-2003 - 6:52am
Quantity and Quality

I would rather have a 12 crinkled dollar bills and 3 really crisp ones than just 3 crisp bills. Maybe the 3 are better "guality" (in some ways) than the messy bills, but in the end, all are worth a dollar - no more, no less. Oh, those pesky silver certificates. Yeah, those are worth more. But you can't save up hours like you do dollars. There are no silver certificate hours that can be brought out later and valued at more than 60 mins. All hours are 60 mins. Once they're gone, they're gone, crinkled and crisp alike.

But you can fill hours! True. The piggy bank analogy. You can fill 18 banks with various coins. 3 banks full of quarters, or 3 bankcs of quarters and 12 filled with pennies.

IMO time matters. All of it might not be crisp, but it's time. And time is valuable.

Joan

Avatar for 1969jets
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 04-16-2003 - 12:09pm
What is quantity time?

Jenna

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 04-16-2003 - 1:13pm
I don't know about the research, but logic tells me that if you have a larger quantity of time with your family, you have more opportunities for "quality" time. I define quality time as time spent playing/doing things with the kids, but also those magic moments you can't plan, like when my 4 year old learns how to do the buckles on his pants for the first time and feels like a big boy or when the baby figures out how to put the shapes in his sorter. I may not be spending time with them at the moment, but I'm there when they run to find me in all their glee to show me.

Jill

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 04-16-2003 - 1:27pm
I don't think it's a bad thing. Consider this though: perhaps parents are more refreshed if they spend some time away from their children, working on their own hobby or interest or even sleeping! It's all a sliding scale.

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