SAHMs cost WOHMs Money?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
SAHMs cost WOHMs Money?
14
Thu, 04-03-2003 - 4:06pm
<<>> - opinion123

Okay. I need some input here in having this explained to me.

I worked my way through a few years of college doing what most 18-20 year olds do. I worked at fast food joints, I worked as an office temp. I now WAH in a job that I made for myself. I make money. I pay taxes. I contribute to my family financially. I am not a part of corporate America, and nor have I been. Do I support myself with what I make? Nope. Could I? YES.

And what about the SAHM who did complete college, did begin a career, and then found herself in a financially stable position to SAH? How does she contribute to Working Women losing out on their paycheck?

I need some help to understand.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 04-03-2003 - 4:10pm
I don't know. I tried to ask op123, but she thought I was playing dumb, so I got no response. Sorry, can't help you.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 04-03-2003 - 9:13pm
I think it is based on general statistics. Women on balance do make less than men if you include all women who work part time or 3/4 time, women who take maternity leave and women who leave the workforce to sah in the study group. If you lump them all together then women as a gender do make less than men. However, as individuals do they really make less?

Dh's company hires people at a flat rate. Male and female engineers for example, make the same starting salary. However, if a female engineer takes maternity leave her annual salary will be less than a male counterpart who didn't take the leave. So yes, if you're looking at annual salaries, the female engineer's mat leave will bring down the average of all female employee's salaries for the company. But not the individual salaries. Which is why women make less statistically.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 04-03-2003 - 10:14pm
I would hope that when statisticians calculate the "wage gap" they would annualize a worker's income so that it is not reduced due to unpaid leave. For example, two engineers, one male and one female, with similar education and experience both earn the same annual salary. The woman has a baby and takes 8 weeks of unpaid leave, so she earns less in year x, but their salaries are still the same. Maybe the next year the man takes an unpaid leave, but still their salaries are the same, and there is no wage gap.

The wage gap is more likely caused by women working part-time (and therefore advancing more slowly) or taking time out of the workforce to be with their families and then starting back at a lower rung on the ladder. Also, (and perhaps this is what op123 was getting at - I didn't see her post) I believe that the perception that a woman isn't going to give 100% to the job once she has children contributes to the gap as well. In other words, some women are "mommy-tracked" whether they want to be or not.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 04-03-2003 - 10:44pm
Yes, I think the wage gap IS caused by wome working part time, flex time or sah. However, I don't think individual women make less. Just that the statisticians take into account ALL female workers when coming up with the whole 74 cents on the dollar statistic. In other words, I don't think o123 as an individual makes less annually than her male counterparts unless she took mat leave or worked part time or refused overtime. If she truly IS making 26 cents less on the dollar than the male employees in her company that's something she needs to take up with her employer.

If a woman is *mommy tracked* it is probably because she chooses to be. If she insists that she and she alone is responsible for all ped appointments, school conferences, sick kid days etc., then yes, she will be mommy tracked. But it's her decision.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 04-03-2003 - 10:56pm
That is what I have noticed. I am an engineer, and if I’m lucky, I’ll earn 74 cents on the dollar. That is mostly because I’ll spend a large portion of my first ten years in the field working part time and/or at jobs with flexible hours, no over time, no travel. Throw in 2 6-months maternity leaves, and it wouldn’t be fair to compensate me at the same rate as someone (male or female) that is more career driven.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 10:31am
I will try and explain. I understood her point but I didn't successfully make mine because I was too freakin mad. The previous posts pretty much explained, with part time work and maternity leave and leaving the work force early.. that is why women make less. My point is that the problem isn't the women doing all those things, it's the men that *don't* do all those things. If more men took maternity leave with their wives, or thought it was ok to work PT and take care of the kids while mom works FT.. well I think the gap would go away. I just think it's sad to say the problem is women not working (read: spending time with their kids) when the real problem is men working too much. O123 did make a good point, there are many women out there who don't view their marriages as partnerships and fully expect their husbands to support them no questions asked, but I would hope that is the exception not the rule. (wishful thinking?)
Avatar for tickmich
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 11:54am
My DH wants to do his fair share and take our DS to doctor appts. However, when he has requested time off for doctors appts, his supervisor who happens to be a woman grudgingly approved the time off but admonished that he shouldnt keep doing this. However, they have approved a part time and telecommuting schedule for a female employee. There is a double standard in general in corporate america where a woman can take the mommy track but there is no such daddy track.

Michelle

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2003
Fri, 04-04-2003 - 2:04pm
I think I can explain it. It is a terrible distortion of a statistic to vent her jelousy of the sahm. If she is making 26 cents to the dollar less, maybe it has something to do with her attitude problem that probably comes out at work as well. By the way, I am not a ft sah. I woh/wah pt and am career and family oriented. Comments like the one you quoted bring an attitude problem out of me, I guess. Luckily, I am make the same rate as my ft male counterparts at work, unlike 0123.

By the way, if you all have not seen me around much, I have been so busy. I have increased wah hours and loving it. Take care all...- Angel

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 04-05-2003 - 7:45pm
And until there is, women will continue to be paid less than their male counterparts. Both men and women are frowned upon in different ways for taking time for their families. Women by being paid less, men by being admonished to not continue to do so. Both are being told that family and work don't mix with the difference being that SHE is expected to lean towards family and HE is expected to lean towards work. When taking care of kids becomes a parent thing to do, then we might attain equality. What we really need is more men taking time off for family.

Unforutunately, I see the same thing where I work. The mommy track has things like telecommuting but the daddy track has overtime. There's an unwritten rule that says that men are supposed to work harder when they have a family to support said family. When they don't, they're questioned much the way WOHM's are questioned regarding their role as mothers in light of their working.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 04-09-2003 - 3:04pm
It is not productive to blame "society" or "pt wohms" or "sahms" if you make less than YOU should.If you are not taking time off, if you are productiove and if you work overtime and go above and beyond,then you should do well.YOUR job is YOUR responsibilty, not anyone elses.If you as a woman have to work a little harder at your co,then I guess that is what you need to do.

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