Sheryl Sandberg Wants Us to "Lean In"

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Sheryl Sandberg Wants Us to "Lean In"
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Mon, 03-11-2013 - 3:57pm

There is a lot in the news regarding Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's new book, "Lean In", in which she is trying to empower women to be more aggressive in the workplace.   It's interesting to read the different viewpoints on the debate, ranging from ABC News to CNN and the New York Times.  

From an iVillage article:

But time is exactly what's holding many women back. The time investment required for women to move ahead in their jobs at all levels -- not just the C-suite spots -- is a deal breaker for many women who aren't willing to sacrifice those hours with their family. All of Sandberg's brilliant plans for redefining how working women are viewed and how they network hinge on the point that women need to want these jobs. And if the current formula of working longer and harder for career success doesn't change, many women won't. 

http://www.ivillage.com/sheryl-sandberg-will-women-want-lean/6-a-526612

The articles discuss various issues that have been debated here before, such as if women can truly have it all and why women aren't as aggressive as their male counterparts to get what they deserve in the workplace.  Detractors feel that with her work history, education and success, she's unable to understand the average working woman, she's not up against the same obstacles.  

What do you think needs to change in the work place in order for women to succeed, and maybe find an easier balance between their work and home lives?  Do you think that encouraging more women to be aggressive about moving up the corporate ladder is realistic?  

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Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>Melissa, there there are sad stories of regret like this from <span style="font-size:small">(now bankrupt)</span> Lehman Brothers CFO Erin Callan:</p><p>&lt;&lt;“I can’t make up for lost time,” she wrote in a Sunday New York Times <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/10/opinion/sunday/is-there-life-after-work.html?ref=opinion&amp;_r=3&amp;" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">opinion piece</a>, “Is There Life After Work?” In it, Callan, who resigned as CFO in 2008, describes how work always came first for her, often at the expense of family, friends and her marriage (which eventually ended in divorce). It also got in the way of her starting a family, though she is now remarried and has stepchildren.<br /><br />“I missed having a child of my own,” she writes. “I am 47 years old, and Anthony and I have been trying in vitro fertilization for several years. We are still hoping.”&gt;&gt;</p><p>Me: I can't imagine how much regret is wrapped up in the day-to-day of a woman going thru IVF at 47 years-old.  That's a lot of regret.  Confirming perhaps no one can have it all.</p>

And psychological damage to boot. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

jamblessedthree wrote:
Sorry for the misspelling, you've seriously not heard that expression about PhDs? Maybe IT'S a geographic thing, Lol. My professor loves to talk about his ranking, The 8 years it took to get his "PhD", That his biases are worth their weight in gold, You don't ask if he likes or not the department dean whose PhD is just as powerful as yours until someone tells you, Not all PhDs have such inflated egos but many do.

All of my grad school professors are PhDs. Last semester, my professor referenced the title of her thesis b/c it was relevant to the conversation at hand, but I've never come across that sort of behavior. Not as an undergrad and certainly not as a grad student. My SIL has her PhD, I have a dear, dear friend from college who is an academic--again, never heard anything like that out of their mouths. Ever.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 8:49pm
You've also said you don't understand why a mom AH would hire a house lady/nanny. Super moms delegate.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

jamblessedthree wrote:
You've also said you don't understand why a mom AH would hire a house lady/nanny. Super moms delegate.

Not this super mom. I do it all myself. Laughing Hence why I don't understand the need for someone to do it all. B/c I juggle the housekeeping, childrearing, & volunteering with grad school. <shrug> I'd be bored out of my mind if I didn't. But I also don't understand SAHPs whose homes are pigstyes. I really don't get what those parents are doing all day...

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 9:02pm

One of my dad's closest friends had/s a PhD, They were school friends, He never married, He'd come over for Saturday dinners and always had the most interesting stories to tell, He was an incredible man. No, I don't think what I experience is common.  What's your point? 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>One of my dad's closest friends had/s a PhD, They were school friends, He never married, He'd come over for Saturday dinners and always had the most interesting stories to tell, He was an incredible man. No, I don't think what I experience is common.  What's your point? </p>

If you don't think what you experience is common, why cite it in a debate?

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 9:10pm

Of course not, Lol. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009

jamblessedthree wrote:
Sorry for the misspelling, you've seriously not heard that expression about PhDs? Maybe IT'S a geographic thing, Lol. My professor loves to talk about his ranking, The 8 years it took to get his "PhD", That his biases are worth their weight in gold, You don't ask if he likes or not the department dean whose PhD is just as powerful as yours until someone tells you, Not all PhDs have such inflated egos but many do.

I dont know what expression you are referring to, and I don't know what the word is that you have misspelled.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009

reginageorge2005 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;One of my dad's closest friends had/s a PhD, They were school friends, He never married, He'd come over for Saturday dinners and always had the most interesting stories to tell, He was an incredible man. No, I don't think what I experience is common.  What's your point? &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>If you don't think what you experience is common, why cite it in a debate?</p>
Do you have any idea what it is we are talking about?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 10:04pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
Sorry for the misspelling, you've seriously not heard that expression about PhDs? Maybe IT'S a geographic thing, Lol. My professor loves to talk about his ranking, The 8 years it took to get his "PhD", That his biases are worth their weight in gold, You don't ask if he likes or not the department dean whose PhD is just as powerful as yours until someone tells you, Not all PhDs have such inflated egos but many do.

Jams, I totally hear that!  Lots of professors teaching my courses were so full of themselves.  I especially remember the class getting an earful from a law prof who boasted about his credentials (which were many).  He was our prof. and also a type of judge, very prestigious.  I remember him getting a laugh from the class (very funny guy) which he quickly followed up with this egomaniacal gem: "That's why they need an Evidence man on the Supreme Ct."  (Meaning him!)  Very full of himself, lots of stories too. 

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