Sheryl Sandberg Wants Us to "Lean In"

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Sheryl Sandberg Wants Us to "Lean In"
101
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 3:57pm

There is a lot in the news regarding Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's new book, "Lean In", in which she is trying to empower women to be more aggressive in the workplace.   It's interesting to read the different viewpoints on the debate, ranging from ABC News to CNN and the New York Times.  

From an iVillage article:

But time is exactly what's holding many women back. The time investment required for women to move ahead in their jobs at all levels -- not just the C-suite spots -- is a deal breaker for many women who aren't willing to sacrifice those hours with their family. All of Sandberg's brilliant plans for redefining how working women are viewed and how they network hinge on the point that women need to want these jobs. And if the current formula of working longer and harder for career success doesn't change, many women won't. 

http://www.ivillage.com/sheryl-sandberg-will-women-want-lean/6-a-526612

The articles discuss various issues that have been debated here before, such as if women can truly have it all and why women aren't as aggressive as their male counterparts to get what they deserve in the workplace.  Detractors feel that with her work history, education and success, she's unable to understand the average working woman, she's not up against the same obstacles.  

What do you think needs to change in the work place in order for women to succeed, and maybe find an easier balance between their work and home lives?  Do you think that encouraging more women to be aggressive about moving up the corporate ladder is realistic?  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>Oh for Pete's sake.

Since I didn't write the quoted response you're objecting to, I could say the same thing. And with better reason.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 9:20pm
ROFLOL!

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 9:15pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
What is the average size home... And why should I care?

puss_boo_kay wrote:
I don't understand why you'd ask the question in the first place if you don't care about the answer!

Oh for Pete's sake.http://25.media.tumblr.com/c6fb46d9987523200eda8265b50310c6/tumblr_miohsxOKWb1qk4m7wo1_500.gif

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009

jamblessedthree wrote:
What is the average size home... And why should I care?

I don't understand why you'd ask the question in the first place if you don't care about the answer!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009

bordwithyou wrote:
<p>What does it mean to "throw your title around" anyway?  I do, if an undergraduate student refers to me by my first name or as "Mrs. X," gently and nicely point out that it's "Dr X" or "Professor X."  I prefer that my graduate students call me by my first name.<br /><br />Just for perception....My office is three doors down the hallway from the main office, and I am the only woman on the floor outside of the secretaries.  Students will routinely walk past two offices with open doors with men sitting at the desks, and then pop their heads into my office to ask where the bathroom is, or can they use my stapler.   Students almost always will address my male colleagues as "Dr X or Professor X," but will occasionally address me as "Mrs X."  I had an e-mail today addressed to "Mrs X."  The subject of the e-mail was the student hearing from "Professor Y" that I was teaching a class on the Vikings in the fall, and asking whether he would be eligible to take it.   I don't think that students maliciously assume that I am a secretary rather than a professor, or that they consciously address their male professors by their titles but sometimes call me "Mrs X."  I think it's a cultural thing, a kind of unconscious sexism that is quite alive and well.</p>

I suspect this whole thing is a less than subtle slam on your professional title, Bord.  Similar to an equally innane and infamous rant that occurred on one of the trillion times I mentioned my son's name is John, and which led to his nickname of Voldemort.

I henceforth suggest your degree initials be changed to Bordwithyou, VdMt.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>I'm surprised this is the second or third time you've repeated this.  Didn't you find anything else in her several posts to discuss?  If one of your students has a typo or innocent malapropism, you grade accordingly?</p>

I should hope she does!  That sort of thing should have been graded out of students in middle school; by the time they are in graduate studies, they should certainly expect their typos and malapropisms (innocent or not) to be reflected adversely in their resultant grades.  If we aren't going to expect high quality work at the university level, when will we?

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 8:32pm
What is the average size home... And why should I care?

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 8:30pm
Yea, I'm one of those SAHMs that call dcps evil, And raising kids isn't as difficult as it is/was for others.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009

<Like most sahms, I worked before I sah.  My education is complete, so I also don't take your word on "training classes" as the last word on education. >

When? 15 years ago? The workplace has changed significantly. My "training class" is how one fortune 100 company with a history of success starts training those identified in leadership positions. It is not one and done but followed by formal mentorships and other classes at other point in leadership as needed to change and empower the leaders as an instrument to increase innovation and agility in a large organization. The class has been great, but I have a long way to go to become a great leader, but the instructor was motivational.

<his recounting workplace dynamics is very telling about this Lean In/Mommy Wars subject>

I would love to hear his take, but filtered though you, not so much.

<But getting women invited to this same conference, or the next one, or the next one, would be you reaching out a hand, Leaning In.>

It is not about the invite, it's about recognition as a leader by the organization. Even in a company that values diversity and women, the skew is still heavily weighted on promoting men. 

Men don't have to "lean in" to be seen, recognized, and appreciated, but woman who "leans in" or behaves in an overly assertive way is vulnerable to being labeled a bi!tch.

<I'm sure computer tech geeks never envisioned Sheryl Sandberg and Marissa Mayer but there it is.>

Applause to Sandberg and Mayer, and perhaps pioneers to more opportunities for women, but they still could be just token outliers. I would rather see corporate culture change to see the strengths of women and men in the workplace, and rid the culture of extreme behaviors that some admired as archetypal leadership traits, assertiveness, competitiveness, independence, and self-confidence. Women  are rarely judged in the same way as men when they display these traits: men are admirable and women are bitches. There should more room for leaders with empathy and the ability to empower their employers (a trait not restricted to men or women). Corporate culture is broken, not women as leaders.

<Your company doesn't sound like it's at the forefront of diversity where women are concerned.>

And sadly, it is rated just that with quatifiable results - It's just not enough yet. Equal opportunity under the law does not mean equal opportunitity in long hold cultural beliefs.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">chestnuthooligan</em> wrote:</div>  I didn't claim to be an authority, but I do have experience, unlike you and Jams. I don't believe your husbands are female, so I discount their experience as having knowledge of how it works.</blockquote></p><p>Like most sahms, I worked before I sah.  My education is complete, so I also don't take your word on "training classes" as the last word on education.  My experience in the workforce and in the classroom was that there were more women then men making 6 figure salaries, and in my graduating class, more women then men again.  My husband has some interesting tales about the dynamics of a workplace much more demanding than any I've ever worked in.  There is a lot more money and power involved, though it's a private corporation.  Still, the dynamics between the men and women are very interesting; his recounting workplace dynamics is very telling about this Lean In/Mommy Wars subject.</p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">chestnuthooligan</em> wrote:</div>  Women did not attend because they are not deemed "leaders". It is by invitation only. The company has been rated in he top 10 of diversity ratings for at least the last 10 years and it rated as one of the best companies for women to work.</blockquote></p><p>Again, keep women in lower level positions flies in the face of a stellar reputation for being diverse.</p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">chestnuthooligan</em> wrote:</div>  I was identified as a leader, therefore invited to the class, not the other way around...I do mentor women in STEM and have been for years, but that are 45 more men "leaning in" than our pathetic 5. Opportunities are still not equal, but as I've said before, they are much better than when I started. The journey is not over.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>Mentoring may be a start. I wouldn't know.  But getting women invited to this same conference, or the next one, or the next one, would be you reaching out a hand, Leaning In.  And MEN can and should be *Leaning In* too.  It could be a movement and it can't be done without men.  Unlike your job, the fields I worked in and my husband works in do have equal opportunities for men and women.  I'm sure computer tech geeks never envisioned Sheryl Sandberg and Marissa Mayer but there it is.  Equal opportunity.  Your company doesn't sound like it's at the forefront of diversity where women are concerned.</p>

Not really into lifelong learning, are you? That explains a lot.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

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