Sheryl Sandberg Wants Us to "Lean In"

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Sheryl Sandberg Wants Us to "Lean In"
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Mon, 03-11-2013 - 3:57pm

There is a lot in the news regarding Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's new book, "Lean In", in which she is trying to empower women to be more aggressive in the workplace.   It's interesting to read the different viewpoints on the debate, ranging from ABC News to CNN and the New York Times.  

From an iVillage article:

But time is exactly what's holding many women back. The time investment required for women to move ahead in their jobs at all levels -- not just the C-suite spots -- is a deal breaker for many women who aren't willing to sacrifice those hours with their family. All of Sandberg's brilliant plans for redefining how working women are viewed and how they network hinge on the point that women need to want these jobs. And if the current formula of working longer and harder for career success doesn't change, many women won't. 

http://www.ivillage.com/sheryl-sandberg-will-women-want-lean/6-a-526612

The articles discuss various issues that have been debated here before, such as if women can truly have it all and why women aren't as aggressive as their male counterparts to get what they deserve in the workplace.  Detractors feel that with her work history, education and success, she's unable to understand the average working woman, she's not up against the same obstacles.  

What do you think needs to change in the work place in order for women to succeed, and maybe find an easier balance between their work and home lives?  Do you think that encouraging more women to be aggressive about moving up the corporate ladder is realistic?  

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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998

<<Me: I can't imagine how much regret is wrapped up in the day-to-day of a woman going thru IVF at 47 years-old.  That's a lot of regret.  Confirming perhaps no one can have it all.>>

I've seen and heard regret from sahms with kids in school full time or empty nest and going through trying to figure out what to do with themselves.  One can have it all, but it's about balance.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 03-13-2013 - 12:59pm

Thardy - How does one see their child all day and why is that a good thing?  Thinking about this...do I just sit them in a room and just look at all of them, all day?   

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Wed, 03-13-2013 - 12:57pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Do we tell men they can't have it all? Men move up the ranks and nobody blinks an eye, SAHWs are just a part of the package, But heaven forbid we take SAHDs to task when the same is mentioned about women, Two income families will always be compared to homes that have a SAHP, And while that's not what you're saying it is important to realze that moms who work and want families can't have it all b/c men that work don't have it all, Somebody is there to pick up the slack you can't. There is plenty of opportunity for women to move up the ranks, Some women just don't see it, Every single principal at my childrens' school is female except the middle school and mal/efemale college professors and deans alike are in positions they want to be in. Rumor has it that PhDs fight fire with eachother more than anybody b/c they place too much emphisis on the the "pile high explicitives" behind their names, Lol.</p>

Coming in late here....

Who are you to say that working women or men can't have it all and what slack is someone picking up for us working folk?    

PumpkinAngel

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Wed, 03-13-2013 - 5:09am

Nice article on this subject: 

http://www.nationaljournal.com/politics/the-washington-women-who-leaned-in-when-sheryl-sandberg-didn-t-20130312

"Born, the head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, was eventually pressured to step down. But much later on, one of the men who had pilloried her, Arthur Levitt, the chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission during the Clinton years, became one of the few men to publicly vindicate her for warnings about the vast over-the-counter derivatives market that was about to help melt down the financial system. “All tragedies in life are always proceeded by warnings,” he told me. “We had a warning. It was Brooksley Born. We didn't listen to that."

So pay attention, Sheryl: You’ve got some serious role models here. Of course, it may be that the life lessons of some of these women could bring back uncomfortable memories for you. As my colleague Matt Cooper pointed out yesterday, Sandberg herself did precious little “leaning in” in the late ’90s while serving as chief of staff to then-Treasury Secretary Summers, when he helped hand Wall Street license to wreak disaster on the American economy. "


And a tweet from Anne-marie SLaughter:

Let me say again: Having it all simply means having what the vast majority of men have: having a family w/o making major career trade-offs.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009

<You missed the point entirely...even when I was in graduate school and in my first years in private practice, the women outnumbered the men.>

Unusual, but I will accept you point without any actual proof on your part, though I'm not sure I believe it. Where are those women now? How many are partners compared to the men in the same hiring year? I'll wait for you to respond with some hard evidence...

Because statistically, women in law doesn't look to equidable financially and opportunity-wise, but I'm sure you have something other than your opinion to refute that?

http://www.catalyst.org/knowledge/women-law-us

<I noticed you changed your tune about your company too, so I bolded it above: diversity and women>

I'm sorry, it's known as irony for the reading-comprehension impaired. My company is actually making a real effort at diversity and it's just not enough. They are rated in the top 10 of corporations for women to work year after year. No change in tune.

<And if it wanted to give the appearance of gender equality, at least it would've had a better showing of women at this one, insignificant apparently, training class.>

They run a business with an ingrained corporate culture that's difficult to change, not a on a quota. Corporate culture doesn't change quickly. They admit the inbalance, and hopefully they will change once corporate culture rebalances to value women. It requires a sea change in organizational thought and our new CEO just may make a difference, but I'm not holding my breath.

<There are many obstacles for women claiming they are being treated less than equally with men.  While women are a protected class under the law, people tend to laugh at that because of the great numbers of women.  It is the Hispanic, the African-American, the wheelchair-bound, who ARE treated unfairly in Fortune 500 and 100 companies.  How many of them, if qualified in terms of education and work history, are "leaders" in this Fortune 100 company?>

Oh my!. Well Barack Obama is the POTUS, so how can one reasonably assume that blacks are discriminated against? [TIC for the irony impaired] Fortune 500 stats: 1.2 Black CEO, 1.7 Asian, 1.2 Hispanic, 4.2 Women, and over 90% White Male. So there is only 8% qualified minorities in the forture 500 companies? It has nothing to do with a corporate culture saving the good stuff the usual suspects?

Your one note responses are insulting to women and minorities as well as quite ignorant of the current workplace. Repeating them ad nauseumm, based on little knowledge or thoughtfulness for an "educated woman" is disheartening, but since you discontinued your education years ago, it can be corrected with a little effort on your part: Call your classmates. What positions have they achieved? How many partners are men? How many are women?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

bordwithyou wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">thardy2001</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;reginageorge2005&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt; Exercise is also a priority for me. I wouldn't be a size 0/2 if it weren't. As it turns out, mowing the lawn with a push mower is an excellent workout. My yard has never looked better. As to house size, I don't exactly live in a mud hut. My house is about a 1000sq ft larger than the national average. Which is why I completely fail to understand what you women with hired help are doing all day. Obviously YOU spend a lot of time online...but I like a clean house. A weekly cleaning would not be sufficient to keep the house up my standards of cleanliness. Obviously it works for you.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;I have a friend who lives in a 10000 sq ft house. She works FT. And she cleans her own house. So it isn't always about square footage...&lt;/blockquote&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;You win.  You're the only one with a life now.  I'm happy you've got your son.  I wasn't here for that ~ I wasn't on this board for years.  I've got three children and a life to see to.  I wish I had the ease of only caring for a singleton and a mud hut.  Alas...&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote> Really, how unbecoming.  And anyway, she has more than one child.</p>

Awww, I'm sorry I missed your bitter snark, Thard. I know, life's rough in your town car. I forgot how much of your life you spend stuck on state lines in it. My bad. 

Both of my children are singletons. What's your point?

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 9:59pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
ROFLOL!

Wink...

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 9:57pm

[Smile....

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 03-12-2013 - 9:57pm

Smile....

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">reginageorge2005</em> wrote:</div> Exercise is also a priority for me. I wouldn't be a size 0/2 if it weren't. As it turns out, mowing the lawn with a push mower is an excellent workout. My yard has never looked better. As to house size, I don't exactly live in a mud hut. My house is about a 1000sq ft larger than the national average. Which is why I completely fail to understand what you women with hired help are doing all day. Obviously YOU spend a lot of time online...but I like a clean house. A weekly cleaning would not be sufficient to keep the house up my standards of cleanliness. Obviously it works for you.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;I have a friend who lives in a 10000 sq ft house. She works FT. And she cleans her own house. So it isn't always about square footage...</blockquote></p><p>You win.  You're the only one with a life now.  I'm happy you've got your son.  I wasn't here for that ~ I wasn't on this board for years.  I've got three children and a life to see to.  I wish I had the ease of only caring for a singleton and a mud hut.  Alas...</p>
Really, how unbecoming.  And anyway, she has more than one child.

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