Speaking of having 3 kids...

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Speaking of having 3 kids...
87
Mon, 04-07-2008 - 3:21pm

Any comments on this editorial that ran yesterday?


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/04/AR2008040403217.html


I really object to the line that says that a family with just two kids is minimalist and "even a little sad."


Any other comments?


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 10:42am

We got around some of the expenses by my sewing a lot of their clothes. They did consignment shops for clothing in high school. And Angela loved to browse the thrift shops for finds. They didn't drive until they were adults (Angela, at age 23, still doesn't drive--her friends do all the driving), and they went to the local community college before going on to a 4-year (and paid for the last 2 years themselves). Joy and Erica paid for their own cars. And none of them had any medical expenses beyond Joy's braces. The only extra-curricular activity they participated in was the swim team in high school. Food, however, was a big expense while Joy and Erica were on the swim team.

Dylan did Karate through the city recreational department which meant that the cost was minimal. He takes band through the school and we borrowed the clarinet from a co-worker. I worked at Dylan's dc and that kept that cost down. We're taking advantage of the NCLB and don't have to pay for Dylan's after school care. In the summer, he goes to the bridal shop with me in the mornings and the Boy's and Girl's Club in the afternoons.

My main point was that a lot of what the studies claim as necessary expenses in raising children really aren't. Or, at least, isn't for a lot of families.

Chris

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 10:45am

*eye roll*...why is it that many (notice I didn't say all) people that live in NY have this strange attitude.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 11:18am
Sewing clothes for Samantha wouldn't save money for us. Fabric is too expensive. :(
baby in clothes basket
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 11:38am
Yes,of course. However, if my child can get into a better school that happens to be out of state and/or private, then I want him to go there. As a result, we are planning for that contingency.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-2007
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 11:59am

Fabric online can be had for pretty decent deals and they run sales pretty often, too.

Besides, you're comparing the price of sewing clothing to ready to wear, not to the price of having clothes made FOR her, which is the true comparison.

Making Samantha's clothes FOR her would mean, you could choose fabric and colors FOR her, size the clothing FOR her. They'd be more fitted, and the quality of construction could be higher. With ready-to-wear, we accept a certain amount of "well, that's good enough", so comparing that price to home sewing isn't quite fair.

~~~~~~~~~

Kitty

~~~~~~~~~

Kitty

"BTW, I hate Lifetime. Their movies will suck you in and all of a sudden you've watched 3 in a row, used every tissue in t

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 1:13pm

Of course. The quality would be much higher. But when your talking about a kid who outgrows clothing every 6 months, high quality isn't really that necessary. And if I want to sew clothes to cut down on clothing costs and I currently purchase ready to wear clothing for her, then yes, the comparison is between ready to wear clothing and home-sewn clothing.

I knit and have no illusions that any clothing I knit for Samantha is actually saving me money. In fact, it's probably double, triple, or more what I would normally pay.

baby in clothes basket
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2005
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 3:02pm

Sure, and you can transfer the dollars to an out of state school. You just have to pay the difference.


 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 5:06pm
That is what I was saying throughout this thread. We have the pre-paid tuition AND we are saving for the possible out of state/private school. We consider the pre-paid tuition plus the 529s or educational IRAs to be the *floor* of our college savings program - they should cover tuition, R&B and non-personal expenses -for instate only. The other savings are not in educational vehicles in case they are not needed.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2005
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 6:05pm

My kids will just have to come up with the difference if they choose to go out of state. I guess it depends on how robust my retirement savings is. I may just go back to work FT to pay for the difference.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-04-2005
Mon, 04-14-2008 - 6:10pm

With making my kids clothing - unless it is something that I really enjoy like a hobby - the time is not worth the money saved. I make $30/hr as an RN. Instead of making a new shirt for my daughter time would be better spent working an extra shift and using the $250 to buy her a new summer wardrobe @ target and then have the time to do other things.


I can not sew. I doubt my kids would wear something I made them.

 

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