Stay home and work at night?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-17-2007
Stay home and work at night?
16
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 4:34pm
I am currently working for an investment firm and I am totally burnt out, so its time for a change regardless of children.

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Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 4:46pm
well you may be different but the thought of working midnight until 8an and then having to spend the day with children makes me want to run for the hills.

 

Yes. We. Did.

Avatar for mommy2amani
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 5:07pm

My question would be, if you are with the kids during the day and working 4-midnight, when are you going to see your DH?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 6:10pm

I didn't do this but a friend of mine did. When I was pregnant and considering the same thing she sat me down and warned me very strongly NOT to do it. (She stopped after about a year.) Not everybody has this experience but she said it was a horrifying strain on both her marriage (because she rarely saw dh) and on her relationship with her children (she was chronically sleep deprived and found herself snapping at them all too often). They did it to save money otherwise spent on daycare. When the stress got to much for them all, they decided it wasn't worth the savings, put the kids in daycare, and spent several months healing the damage.

There are others who have a perfectly fine experience. But I took her warning to heart and didn't do it. It is not something to go into lightly. They did it to save money by not spending it on daycare. Doing it to be able to spend more time with the kids and other family members is not an advisable reason to do it. Unless you are very comfortable with that type of shift (have done it for years prior to kids), you won't be aware of what chaos it can wreak on your body and what damage chronic sleep deprivation can do to relationships. Some people are well-suited to this. But these people have often worked night shift for quite awhile and their bodies are adapted to that sleep schedule.

Avatar for myshkamouse
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 6:34pm

Don't do it! My DH used to work around the clock (ran a derivatives trading fund) occasionally, and, he had team members who did the night shift as their regular gig. They were a mess. They needed the days' to sleep.


I dated a guy before my DH who was a trader and traded the HK exchange primarily from Bermuda. He was up all night. He didnt function in the day.


Its not something I can see working long (or even relatively short) term with kids.


iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2005
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 9:10pm

If you work midnight-8, than when will you sleep? You cannot go days without sleep.

I work as anurse in a hospital and did a few overnight shifts before I switched to days. It is extremely hard to do unless you have help during the day to help you get some sleep.

I have see plenty of people at work burn out quick or get sick b/c they thought "napping" with their baby during the day was enough.

4-midnight might be better.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Mon, 09-17-2007 - 10:07pm

I can't (and won't) tell you what to do but here are some thoughts for consideration:


Not all babies sleep during the day.

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-08-2007
Tue, 09-18-2007 - 10:47am
I do this twice a week, but from 7pm to 7 am. And I'm barely hanging on the days I work. Or the day after a night shift. The only reason this is doable is because I only do it twice a week. Five days a week, impossible. Unless the kids are older and in school and you sleep during school hours. I barely function and drag myself through the day the two days after I worked a night shift. As for your statement about spending time with the kids and nieces and nephews, if you do,it won't be what you think, it'll be you in a sleepy fog forcing yourself through your days.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-17-2003
Tue, 09-18-2007 - 12:04pm
Try it and if you don't like it, try something else.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-2007
Tue, 09-18-2007 - 12:21pm

OKay, I agree with everything you wrote, but will you concede that back before you worked those 12 hour shifts, you thought it would be easier than it ultimately turned out to be? :)

Shiftwork (12a-8a) *can* be a good solution for families, but as you said, it is NOT without its downside. It's a good solution, imo, for parents of middle and high school aged children--kids who can be somewhat self-sufficient in getting themselves ready for school and who won't be home all day most days. Who are old enough to understand Mom's (or Dad's) need for sleep when they ARE home and who can be relied on not to disturb Mom on the days they are home during the day. Getting sufficient sleep is definitely tricky on shift work, both because it's harder to sleep during the day and the odds of getting 8 hours of sleep are pretty low--and shiftwork sleep is the kind of sleep where you really need MORE sleep than you might need working days (because day-time sleep is of lesser quality than night time sleep).

It can be a good solution, but it's not a magic solution and it absolutely requires the full support and cooperation of family and friends to work out.

~~~~~~~~~

Kitty

"BTW, I hate Lifetime. Their movies will suck you in and all of a sudden you've watched 3 in a row, used every tissue in t

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-18-2005
Tue, 09-18-2007 - 7:38pm

Oh yeah! I thought I could sleep when the kids are in school, etc. But, it didn't turn out that way. I also started nursing at the age of 35. Maybe if I were 10 years younger it might have been easier.

My post was mainly a warning b/c I wish someone would have told me what could go wrong. I was lucky in that my nurse manager really liked me and put me on day shift right away.

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