Transitioning back to work

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Transitioning back to work
81
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 12:25pm
I'm not sure if this topic belongs here - so feel free to ignore or redirect me. I was on another board and the topic of what should the Stay-at-Homes years count for when you transition back to the work world. Does staying at home allow you to develop new skills or do you just go right back to entry-level? Does this subject come up here once in a while? My quick review of recent threads didn't come up with anything.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 11:48am

Well, I said SAH, not parenting.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 12:30pm

>>I don't kid myself that it has been a good career move. <<

LOL. Yeah, SAH, overall isn't good for a career, that's an understatement.

I'm just trying to say that it is not skill-less. It's not just being a maid or a daycare worker. It is challenging. There are transferable skills. If you'd been in a different field to begin with, you might have improved your negotiation skills, at least you used them parenting.

I think the experience post-SAH is not only underpaid, but also undervalued. IMHO, it should not equate skill-wise to delivering pizza or packages, working at a cash register or painting houses, but it seems others do.

I'm hearing that the bottom line is it goes unrewarded financially, because it is just a bunch of skill-less tasks. I suppose it's just a matter of opinion, but still it surprises me.




Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 12:33pm
I don't think anyone here is saying they are skill-less tasks - just that depending on your profession it may not be easy to leap frog back into where you were if you hadn't taken that time off that's all.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 1:29pm

I think very few jobs are skill-less, and that goes for being a SAHP as well.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 1:35pm

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 2:18pm

In what way do you want it to "count"?


It doesn't count as job experience because it isn't a job.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 2:33pm

>>You keep putting down pizza delivery driver, but honestly, the multi-tasking, task management and people management skills I learned during my years as a pizza delivery driver are far greater than those that I've learned or honed as a parent.<<

I am surprised to hear this. But I also think it supports my premise that you don't think the skills involved in raising children are all that valuable.

>>Why do you think that being a SAHP gives you more skills than you would have if you were a parent plus -- to use one of your examples -- worked as a daycare provider or a maid in addition to parenting?<<

I will clarify that I said daycare worker. A person who is operating a daycare would have business type skills. As for why I think that, I'm at a bit of a loss, it just seems intuitively obvious. I was hoping that someone would sort of see where I'm coming from, not that everyone would like this idea was completely off the wall.




iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 2:42pm

>>It doesn't count as job experience because it isn't a job. <<

>>Plus, most employers are looking for experience you developed in a job (or volunteer) setting.<<

I don't think the development of skills is the same as "job experience". But I don't see how developing skills in a volunteer position is different that from parenting.

>>If someone thinks she's developed skills as a sahp that are transferable to a particular job, she can always make her case on a resume or in an interview. <<

Yes, that's what I mean. Doesn't mean all SAH's will, but that it can be done and should "count".

>>But unless you're looking at careers that involve working with kids, it't hard for me to see how it would be relevant <<

Again, I think that viewing of SAH's as housecleaners and babysitters is an unjust pigeonhole and doesn't address the more relevant skills.

>>It's really just your word that you've developed all these skills as a sahp--there aren't independent references your prospective employer can contact.<<

I'm pretty sure that former employers are only allowed to say "yes she worked here" and "yes I would hire her again" they can't independently backup or negate any premise you make as far as skills go.




iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 2:52pm

>>I don't think anyone here is saying they are skill-less tasks <<

I chose the word skill-less to describe the tasks involved in activities such as delivering pizza, cleaning, working in a daycare, and normal daily activities. I am open to a better suggestion. Entry level? Low skill?

>> just that depending on your profession it may not be easy to leap frog back into where you were if you hadn't taken that time off <<

Of course it's a challenge to transition back, even I'm not saying otherwise.




iVillage Member
Registered: 08-08-2006
Sun, 04-27-2008 - 3:06pm


You would be wrong.

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