Transitioning back to work

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Transitioning back to work
81
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 12:25pm
I'm not sure if this topic belongs here - so feel free to ignore or redirect me. I was on another board and the topic of what should the Stay-at-Homes years count for when you transition back to the work world. Does staying at home allow you to develop new skills or do you just go right back to entry-level? Does this subject come up here once in a while? My quick review of recent threads didn't come up with anything.



Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 1:54pm

I'll be true to my Econ degree and answer: It Depends. It depends on how much time off. It depends on how much a person worked before taking time off. It depends on if the person took any career advancing classes during the time off. It depends on if the person kept up with their certifications/licenses. It depends on if they kept up professional contacts while they were at home. It depends on the type of job. It depends on the availability of other qualified people who are also looking. It depends on if they did pro bono/volunteering jobs that relate to their career. It depends on if you burnt any bridges when you left. IT depends on if the gap includes living overseas for the spouse's job.

Based on my experience and answering extremely generally: a gap of 5-7 years when the person worked 10+ years prior to the gap in their field and kept up reasonably with things - can expect to enter at or just below where they were when they left. If the skill set they needed for their prior job has changed significantly or they let a license lapse or the gap is over 10 years, then probably closer to entry level.




Edited 4/26/2008 1:58 pm ET by tryingtoquit
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 2:08pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 2:55pm

>>But there are no points for SAH in itself.<<

So, for those who either continued to work or worked part-time, have there been any benefits to your job from your parenting experience?




iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 3:04pm
I don't really understand your question? Are you asking if someone is better at their job because they are a parent? Or are you asking are there any skills in parenting that translate to a job?
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 3:20pm

I did not stay in the work force.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 3:20pm

Actually, you apparently do understand. :)

This is the second question: Are you asking if someone is better at their job because they are a parent? This is the original question: Or are you asking are there any skills in parenting that translate to a job?

Having done this parenting gig for a few years know, I think it has changed me so much as a person and has forced me to practice so many things, multi-tasking to name one, that it is hard for me to believe that people generally think of parenting as a skill-less job, even after they've done it. That's all really.




iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 3:26pm

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-11-2006
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 3:35pm
Not at the rate or in the ways that I did.



iVillage Member
Registered: 01-05-2000
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 9:04pm

It has come up, just not recently. And the answer is "it all depends". I could take time off and go right back to my career (dressmaking/alterations) with little or no loss of position. I would lose seniority and any raises that would have taken place during my absence. But other than that, I could go back and pick up right where I left off. But not many careers can do that. There are jobs (mostly retail/hourly) that could say that but I would think that one couldn't say that about any high paying/salary jobs/careers without a conscious effort to maintain skills and knowledge in the mean time.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-21-2001
Sat, 04-26-2008 - 9:10pm

I think it really depends on your job and the skills required.


I am an engineer.

Pages