TVs at daycare?

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-29-2002
TVs at daycare?
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Tue, 08-19-2003 - 1:41pm
I have noticed the use of TVs mentioned several times when daycare centers and providers are discussed. Is this really usual? Between the two kids, I have used 5 daycare groups and two afterschool care groups and only once was there a TV regularly stationed at the daycare (it was at an English Nursery, which tended to be run very differently from the normal daycares where I live). TV simply isn't part of the daily activity. At the two Swiss daycares there wasn't a TV even available for unusual use, while at dd's last daycare group, a TV was brought in from another school for a special Christmas show once in the two years she attended that group. Even at the afterschool care groups that ds attends (kids ages 7-10), there is one TV for the entire school (kindergarten to 9th grade) which is only brought into the afterschool care twice a month on fridays for watching one video.

So, out of curiousity, how many have regular TV use at their daycare (center, private, home etc.). How do you feel about this? The one time I experienced it, at the English Nursery, I was really upset. They were supposedly only using it for the first couple of months for a half-hour before "circle time" in order to get the kids settled and for 15 minutes at the end of the preschool day (it went from 8:30 to 2:15) in order for the dcp to be able to clean the place up "in peace". I didn't mind it in theory, but the practice was much more lax. I noticed that the afternoon time was often extended to a half hour or more (I often picked ds up half an hour early) and I couldn't understand why, with 3 dcp, it couldn't be possible for one to read quietly to the other children while the others picked up. I was also quite about unhappy about the choices, ds was very sensitive at the time and couldn't deal well with even most disney movies. I made a pretty big stink about it, which surprised most of the parents who didn't seem to mind, but in the end they followed my suggestions.

Laura

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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-28-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 1:53pm
I've told my nanny that she can put a video (one of those "Baby---" ones) in during the day. I've told her that I wouldn't want her watching it more than once a day, though. I suppose there are days when the nanny probably puts it in a couple of times. As long as it's not more than that, I feel OK about it.

I know other parents, though, who have nannies, and who have used nannycams that the TV goes on when the parent leaves. I guess that's a disadvantage to having a nanny (vs DC center or in home DC) at your house with just your baby...
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-25-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 2:00pm
My sons preschool, which is also a day care center, doesn't even have a tv in it. I like that.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-15-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 2:13pm
I don't have a lot of experience with "formal" DCP's, as I have mainly been a SAHM. But my son recently started attending pre-K at a DC facility. They have a TV in the room, and first thing in the mornings, as the children come in, the TV is on.

They do this to

1) help the children who are new to the situation (like my son), feel a little more comfortable (they will be more comfortable if they see one of their favorite programs on, as it is then not *entirely* unfamiliar), and

2) to give the teachers and parents a minute or two to talk, and catch up on anything they may need to discuss about the child.

It is turned off once all the children are present and it is time for breakfast. They are usually bringing in breakfast trays as I am leaving, so I would say no more than 10 minutes of TV. The TV is not turned on anymore during the day. I don't think it is that unhealthy of a practice, so long as it is not being done all day, or for extended periods. There is nothing wrong with TV at all, as long as the programs being shown are geared toward the children's ages, and many times they are integrated into the daily activities or lessons. --->Dawn

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 2:26pm
Hasn't been a "regularly stationed" tv in any of the 5-6 centers I've ever used. All of them HAD a tv; none of them had cable service, it was only used for the occasional movie.

hollie

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 2:29pm
How the tv was used would concern me. My son's preschool has one tv in the media center. The tv is sometimes used during media. They show a short video that ties in with whatever the weekly theme is. For example, if the weekly theme is sharing the kids might see a half hour video one day.

I would be against the kids sitting and watching tv for extended periods of time during preschool, but I have no problem with infrequent, curriculum related videos.

Jenna

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-29-2002
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 2:55pm
This may be one difference. The daycares where I live have a set of rules for introducing new children to daycare/preschool: there is a one to two week "inskolning" (I can't for the life of me come up with an English equivalent for the word, maybe "schooling in"?). During this time, a new child is very gradually introduced to the dc environment, so that usually a child stays, along with a parent, for about 1 hour the first day, 2-3 hours the second day and then is left without the parent for about 1 hour the 4th day and 2 hours the 5th day. If all goes well with this, the parent can start leaving a child for a few hours at the beginning of week 2 (often until just after lunch-time), and then the child is worked up to the normal schedule by the end of week 2. If several children are scheduled to start at the dc during the same fall period, the children are staggered so that no more than 2-3 children are having a "schooling in" at the same time...that way, the dcp have enough time on their hands to focus on the few new children. The same system, btw, is applied when a child enters school at the age of 6 (kindergarten), although for older children, the "schooling in" period is usually reduced to 4-5 days.

In the case of the preschool that had the TV, they did not have this "schooling in" period and so had 20 odd children arriving on the same day, most for the first time. I didn't actually have a big objection to the use of it in the morning before circle time, though I did object to the content. I was far more irritated by the afternoon use for "winding the kids down" when having a teacher read to all the children could be equally effective (all of the kids were over 3)

Laura

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 3:11pm
The dc my dd used to attend had one tv available for videos that were relevant to some activity the kids were doing or a topic they were discussing. It was hardly ever used. I think she watched one video in the 1 1/2 years she went there.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 3:42pm
Wonderful idea .. but just not feasible for the majority of centers.

I always try to give my kids *at least* one "transition" day, but it doesn't always work. This last time, my kids didn't arrive in this state until the two days before I started work. So, their first day at daycare was about 6 hours. Their second was a full day. Although I would have liked to have an easier transition, it just wasn't possible.

And, I think that's true for enough working parents, that daycares couldn't implement that type of system and still get customers. I would have had to choose a different provider, had mine that that requirement.

Hollie

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 3:44pm
I agree, with one exception. I have no proglem with infrequent use even if it *isn't* curriculum related. No harm in preschoolers watching an 90 minute Disney movie once a month or so ...

Hollie

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-29-2002
In reply to: laura_w2
Tue, 08-19-2003 - 4:02pm
Pretty much every type of daycare center here has the same requirements (the English nursery was the only exception I encountered and this was meant more as a preschool than a dc), though the "schooling in" period can be adjusted to the individual child (shorter if they adapt very easily as dd did, or longer if they are having an especially hard time). Parents basically have to take the time off to do this whether it works for their schedule or not, so they usually aim to have a child enter dc some weeks before they have to be at work again (in the case of a child going for the first time) or save up vacation to cover the time period. Usually, the parents split the job of "schooling in", to minimise the vacation loss for each. As far as I know, all dc will insist on this time and pretty much all employers will allow even a new employee the time to do this. I do like the system, but I can imagine that it would be very impractical for most centers in the U.S.

Laura

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