Typical 9-5 job?

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-07-2009
Typical 9-5 job?
26
Fri, 08-21-2009 - 4:07pm

Are there really that many of them? I know many more people that work other than 9-5 than 9-5.

Most of the people I knew growing up were factory workers. Day shifts in factory usually start 6-7 and end 3-4 (plus many work other than day shifts.

In mine and my DHs military careers the day shift was either 7-4 or 7:30-4:30 (again many worked other shifts.

In my job now I usually work from about 7:30-4:15, DH's shift is similiar.

My DD1 either goes in very early and works until early afternoon or goes in mid morning and works until 6:00.

My DD2 is a teacher so does not work 9-5.

People I know in the medical field do not work 9-5.

People in retail and restaurants do not work 9-5.

I think that a 9-5 schedule is fairly limited to those working in offices and I do not know if office workers are a large enough % of total workers to consider their shift typical.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Fri, 08-21-2009 - 4:51pm

but there is alot of industries that are office jobs.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-07-2009
Fri, 08-21-2009 - 5:25pm

Not all office workers are not working 9-5.

Because of being a global economy many office workers are shift workers to accommodate world wide time zones.

Many companies allow flex time. Both of the jobs my DH has had since leaving the Air Force do (both corporate office jobs). Everyone is required to be in the office between the hours for 9-3 but can flex either way to accomplice that. For instance my DH goes in early and is off about 3:00, some of his co-workers go in at 9:00 and work later.

The rush "hour" backs that up. The rush hours here starts about 6:00 and runs until about 10:00 in the morning and starts about 4:00 in the afternoon and runs until about 7:00. So obviously not everyone is working 9-5.

Also the rush hour reflects the employees in that area not the nation as a whole. The rush hours in areas with a lot of factories would have a different rush hour pattern than an area with not a lot of manufacturing.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-10-2009
Fri, 08-21-2009 - 8:30pm

Most of the people I know work 8-5.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 12:17am

Typical simply means "combining or exhibiting the essential characteristics of a group " according to Merriam-Webster. So yes, there are plenty of "typical" 9-5 jobs, but that doesn't mean they are the "majority" of jobs within the workforce. Referring to a "typical 9-5 job" means just that - jobs that usually require a person to work those hours. If I said "she works typical teachers' hours" - I would take that to mean, she works *at school* around the same hours that school is in session, with maybe 30 minutes tacked onto either end and has much of the summer off.

To answer your question, people I know have all kinds of hours depending on the type of job they have but where I live, there are plenty of people who work in the corporate sector in jobs that "typically" require people to be in the office a minimum of 9-5. My husband has one of those kinds of jobs, and while he has lots of flexibility, for the most part, normally he works those hours. He can go in earlier and leave earlier, but he wouldn't be able to do it every day. He also works much more than 40 hrs a week, as do most of the people in mgmt/upper mgmt/executive positions. Most of the people I know working in the corporate world are in these type of positions. Of course, I also know many people who don't work in the corporate world, and their hours vary - some work 8-5ish, others have all kinds of different schedules.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 4:15am

I have never had a 9-5 job. For years I worked nights, usually going to work around 5PM and coming home around 1-2AM. These days, I typically work from 10-1 and then again from 4PM to 8PM or so. I have been working around dd's schedule as long as she has been in school.

My lawyer next door (since lawyers were mentioned) spends the morning in court or meeting clients, then has lunch, then goes to his riding club and he writes his briefs late at night. I don't know many 9-5ers either. Many of the people I know are academics or self-employed, so set hours are not common in their lives.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 10:48am
It would be interesting to see that stats. Nobody in my family works 9-5, M-F. DH and I are both academics. My sisters work various jobs from being a dispatcher for the city buses to being an apartment manager, to being a medical rep. One is a SAHM right now. The three sisters that are married, none of their spouses work M-F 9-5. Two of the men work as long distance truckers (one owns his own company) and the third works with his wife managing the apartment complex. Many of my friends are in academia or in the medical field. Our secretarial staff here works either 8-4 or 9-5, though.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-07-2009
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 11:10am
I tried Googling to see if I could come up with some stats but apparently could not come up the magic words needed to give me that info.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 11:25am

According to the Current Population Survey conducted by Census Bureau, in 2001, 30.3% of full time wage and salaried workers aged 25 to 34 used flexible schedules for their primary jobs.

Among other age groups: 29.9% of those aged 35 to 44, 29.2% of those aged 45 to 54, 26.4% of those aged 55 to 64, and 31.2% of those 65 years and older used flexible schedules for their primary jobs. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2005).

According to the 2001 Current Population Survey conducted by Census Bureau, the use of flexible schedules varies by gender, with higher percentages of men reporting use than women in every age group. 31.2% of men 45 to 54 years old use flexible schedules in contrast to 26.8% of women; 28.8% of men 55-64 use in comparison to 23.5% of the women;and 36.7% of the men 65 years and older in comparison to the 22.0% of the women. (U.S. Census Bureau, 2005). “Workers in the 55-64 year-old age group use options such as flexible work hours less than employees in other age groups.” For example, only 11.2% of workers aged 55-64 use flexible work schedules “a lot”, compared to 20.7% of workers aged 18-24. (Pitt-Catsouphes & Smyer, 2006

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-07-2009
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 11:55am

That is interesting but I think the % of people who have flexible schedules is different from the % of people who work other that 9-5 jobs.

I have a bit of flexibility in my job. When I was hired I was told that my start time was 8ish. Work load determines my work hours not the numbers on the clock.

It is really hard for my father to grasp. He spent his work life in factories. You were assigned a work shift and that is when you worked. One time he and my mom were visiting and I stayed home to see them off on the morning they left. He was extremely worried about me getting in trouble for being late to work.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 08-22-2009 - 12:14pm
Yeah, there are those people who work outside 9-5 hours but their jobs are not very flexible -- all kinds of shift workers. I did shift work for many years and the only flexibility in the hours was that we could take comp time in lieu of overtime pay -- so if I worked four hours overtime I could get six hours off sometime later. But that's not working 9-5. And there are lots of people like me now who don't punch a clock but get paid for accomplishing certain things. I am working this afternoon (Saturday) for our new grad student orientation from 2-5 pm. The next time I will have to be anywhere at a certain time will be for the start of my first class of the semester at 10 am. But I will probably work about twelve hours between now and 10 am Monday.

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