the value of having a SAHP

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
the value of having a SAHP
549
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 8:57am

Whatever your circumstances, and whatever your family's complex mixture of reasons for choosing to have a SAHP, or not....


do you see any value at all, for a typical child, in having a SAHP (either short term or long term)?


Even if in your family, the many benefits of having dual-WOHPs outweigh any potential benefits of having a SAHP (or if having a SAHP is literally impossible for whatever reason), do you actually acknowledge that that are benefits to be had by choosing to have a SAHP?


(on the assumption that the hypothetical SAHP is happy to SAH, and puts a lot into it)

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2007
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:01pm
For a change, I actually read through the thread first, so I don't have a wildly original response.

Yeah well, that's just, ya know, like, your opinion, man-The Big Lebowski 

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-18-2007
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:15pm
But The Bad Seed seems to be turning out pretty well, and you never know.

Yeah well, that's just, ya know, like, your opinion, man-The Big Lebowski 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:20pm
A "SAHP" situation is one where the parent is not employed outside the home. It does not say anything about the amount of othercare a child receives. If you want to redefine "SAHP" any way you want, then of course you could make a circular argument that having one is good for kids.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:23pm
I have no clue what it is you are agreeing with here.
iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:25pm
Well, see, if the experience of having a WOHP effectively parallels having a SAHP for the child, then you can't really claim that there is some exclusive benefit to the child of having a SAHP.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-23-2007
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:38pm
I think it depends on the family environment and the child's temperament. I was a child who hated daycare more than anything. I still have terrible memories of daycare (and I was put in very good in-home daycares). Some children do very well in daycare. If there aren't financial limitations (needing a dual WOHP situation), then I do think the parents can tailor the way they want their child cared for, whether that is full time childcare by the parent, full-time childcare by a daycare, or somewhere in between.
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iVillage Member
Registered: 05-22-2006
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:44pm

I don't think my children got anything out of daycare that they couldn't get at home with me before the age of 18 months or so.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-22-2006
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 12:55pm

I guess my daughters have the best of both worlds then!

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 1:12pm

what i agreed with was that kids learn to adapt...and i added the thought that kids often adapt because they have no choice in it anyway - not to raise an argument that kids SHOULD have a choice in whether mom or dad should leave them for work but sometimes what we

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-04-1997
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 1:22pm
My kids went through stages where they didn't think having vegetables every evening was in their best interests. My DS, who has had his driving permit for one whole week as of tomorrow, thinks its in his best interest to drive as much as possible, and I think it's really in his best interests not to be driving in ice until he has built up a record of more than 45 minutes behind the wheel in good weather. Oh well. Sometimes kids have a very funny view of what is in their best interests. That's why we're the parents.

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