the value of having a SAHP

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
the value of having a SAHP
549
Wed, 02-13-2008 - 8:57am

Whatever your circumstances, and whatever your family's complex mixture of reasons for choosing to have a SAHP, or not....


do you see any value at all, for a typical child, in having a SAHP (either short term or long term)?


Even if in your family, the many benefits of having dual-WOHPs outweigh any potential benefits of having a SAHP (or if having a SAHP is literally impossible for whatever reason), do you actually acknowledge that that are benefits to be had by choosing to have a SAHP?


(on the assumption that the hypothetical SAHP is happy to SAH, and puts a lot into it)

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-12-2004
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 1:47pm

"I cherish my one on one time with my kids though so she's not alone.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-02-2008
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:08pm

Including the boss, there were about 20 people in the office. The only male was the boss. Of the women, only two of us had no children. The rest were working moms - majority married or with significant others living with them. I think there were two moms who were divorced.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-02-2008
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:22pm

I respect your opinion but I can honestly say that I grew up very independent and am able to make my own decisions. Perhaps I didn't word my previous post clearly, but my mother nor my father coddled me, they were there for me in different ways than those parents who opt to work are there for their children. I was merely answering the question of the value of having a stay at home parent, not trying to say one method is better than another. I prefer to stay at home because I think it is best for my child. I didn't say that it was best for all children.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-07-2007
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:26pm

"If I was constantly there to coddle my child, I'm afraid they would not grow up to be very independent. I think helicopter parenting creates a child who grows up to be an adult who can't make decisions."


I don't think being a SAHP automatically means you're coddling your child--to me it means you do in fact have a job and it's working at home being a parent and a homemaker.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-14-2006
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:29pm

"they were there for me in different ways than those parents who opt to work are there for their children."


Did you father not WOH?

Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:45pm

Coddling a child is just as likely to happen to a working mom as it is a SAHM.


yup...I agree!

"If gay Americans are not allowed to get married and have all the benefits that American citizens are entitled to by the Bill of Rights, they should get one hell of a tax break. That is my opinion,"

- Jeane "Dear Abby" Phillips, in an interview with Lisa Leff.

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-02-2008
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:48pm
I grew up on a farm. My dad was always in sight unless he was delivering goods and equipment to other farms and businesses. So, in a sense, my dad was a stay at home parent. Not only did I have both of my parents there, but both of my dad's brothers and their families lived within waking distance of our house with both of my uncles working on the farm. We had a very close-knit family with everyone pitching in. It was nice for me as a child. It showed me as a child the value of family and relationships. Now, living on a farm and having a
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-02-2008
Fri, 05-09-2008 - 2:56pm

I couldn't have said it better! :)

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