The value of SAH

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
The value of SAH
670
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 10:57am
Thought this would make interesting debate fodder.

http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/CollegeandFamily/P46800.asp

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 11:17am
I have never agreed with those inflated financial benefits of SAH for many of the same reasons that she cited.

In most of them they use full time salaries for each job. But logic alone tells you that no one can do put in 4o hours per week on 6 different jobs.

The only financial loss to the family if they did not have the SAHP would be the things that they would actually hire someone else to do. In many cases that is only childcare. In most cases the spouse left behind just picks up the other things themselves. No one runs out and hires a chauffuer, housekeeper, chef etc when they loose a spouse. When my mother died my father did not hire someone to do the laundry or cook the meals, things that she normally took care of he just does them himself.

If the SAHP gets financial value points for things did in the home then the WOHP also gets financial value points for the things they do in the home. If the WOHP watches the kids on Saturday then they get childcare financial points and those hours are subtracted from the SAHP "paycheck". If the WOHP cooks a meal then they get chef financial points and the SAHP doesn't get "paid" for that meal.

I do agree that there is value in SAHP but the financial value is very limited.

Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 11:22am
The thing I find funny is that these analysis never seem to figure in that WP's do the same things that SAHP's do!! The only difference between me as a WM and me as a SAHM is I would spend more time providing child care, do a little more housework and a little more cooking. The rest I do whether I work or I don't. Why do they only attribute value to the things parents do when it's done by a SAHM?



iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:04pm
I agree the only real difference is the childcare while the spouse is at work, making lunch, cleaning up any messes made during the day.

The rest of the household cleaning and cooking, laundry, shopping, errands, bill paying, yardwork, running kids around, etc still has to be done in a household whether there is a SAHP or not. The logistics of who are doing all of those chores may be different in a dual working household but they are still all being done.

So if a SAHP gets $XX for the value of what they do then the dual working couple get $XX-what someone else does for them.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:13pm
Well, even $30,000 isn't something to sniff at...although, I suppose that depends on your geographic location, and what $30,000 is worth.
Avatar for cindytree
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-28-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:27pm
I thought it was a realistic article. As a SAHM, I never bought into those articles that compared my being at home to the work of 17 others who do the individual jobs full time. It doesn't take me that long to clean house, pay the bills or anything else. But if I'm wrong, then show me the money! lol!

I do agree that my being at home for the last 22 years does make me a little more vulnerable financially and that I probably am not going to waltz into a business and land a higher paying management job with nothing recent on my resume except freelance writing.

However, on the other side, we have done a lot of what they suggest to protect ourselves in the event my husband would die or lose his job or something. We have good life insurance policies on both of us, some savings, have paid off debt (we still owe a little on our mortgage but that will be paid off in a few years), and have insvestments/401K, etc.. So I don't worry. I'm a very resourceful person and would find a way or make a way to provide for my family if the situation got reversed.

Thanks for sharing the article Cyndi. I was thinking about posting it too.

Cindy

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:29pm
That is $30,000 with no benefits, no vacation, no sick days, no personal days, no medical insurance, no 401K, no flext-time, no disability, no lunch hour- NO NOTHING! So, in my eyes that $30,000 is something to sniff at.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:30pm
I was going to post something similar. However, there is another difference between you and a SAHM, you bring home a paycheck.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:32pm
One thing I never understood is the constant discussing of the "value" of a SAHM. What about the value of a WOHM? Is the SAHM somehow more valuable? Hardly.
Avatar for cyndiluwho
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 12:39pm
What parent gets vacation days away from their kids? Vacation days aren't part of the package if you're a parent, period.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-08-2003
Sat, 06-14-2003 - 1:05pm
In our home my being a housewife is far more valuable to us in our marriage and for our family and home than I would be as a WOHW. Especially since I'd only be bringing in in the neighborhood of $200-$250 clear a month. Especially since when I did work (which I brought in more because that was before parenthood) the amount I brought home compared to my husband's was so little we didn't even use it for bills, mtg., etc. But it was great to buy furniture, extras, travel, just blowing spending money.

I think the "value" of either one is in the "eye of the beholder". My husband and I place great value on housewife/sahm here because here it is of more value. But everyone's situation is different IMHO.

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