What we need is better daycare, not less of it.

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
What we need is better daycare, not less of it.
6
Tue, 01-29-2013 - 4:57pm

Researchers from the US and Norway joined together to study the effects of day care and behavior issues.  Previous studies found that there was a link between the two, while this new study finds that it's the quality of daycare that makes the difference:     

In other words, when all the energy that goes into debating the merits of day care is put, instead, into ensuring that day care is of a high quality and available to everyone, then any association between time spent in that care and poor behavior essentially disappears. “Whereas child care in U.S. policy is generally treated as an unintended or unfortunate consequence of workforce participation among women,” the researchers wrote, “child care in the Norwegian corporatist economy is part of a broader family policy to promote maternal workforce participation and employment rights … as well as universal access to high-quality environments for learning and development beginning in the second year of life.”

Read more at: http://parenting.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/day-care-and-behavior-problems-unlinked/?smid=fb-share

Do you think it's an issue of the child being in daycare at all, or the quality of the daycare itself?  Do you think subsidized daycare such as they have in Norway is the way the US needs to be moving towards?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011

What a selfish outlook.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 02-21-2013 - 10:57am

I think there's a lot of value for society in subsidizing comprehensive, quality child care. Too many women (and their children) are sentenced to a life of poverty just for becoming mothers at inopportune times. 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 01-31-2013 - 10:58am
Norway's sales tax is a good one IMO and I seriously think doing something that extreme is what this country needs to get out of the debt its in too.

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 01-31-2013 - 10:53am

That kind of program would be consistent with the kind of changes this president is already making. And I actually favor this, If quality subsidized care meant putting more people to work and having a safe outlet for your children then more powr to it, The alternative is that we allow moms to stay at home on my dime who really can't afford to be there. Further, Would you really see that much of a differnece in your pay than what already is taken out? I'm always amazed by the end of the year tax statements from DH's employer and the little of his real pay he actually sees, Lol, Oh, And we don't get to write off daycare either. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2008

I agree with Thardy2001 100%! 

It is all economics and absurd to compare the daycare facilities in Norway with what we have.

Norway has an annual oil revenue of approximately US$30 billion, a sales tax of 25%, crazy high income tax rates, and next to no illegals.  Among developed countries, Norway also has the lowest obesity rate (which translates to lower healthcare spending).   Until Americans are willing to pay more taxes, live in more modest houses, bike and/or take public transporation to work, etc., we simply cannot afford the kind of daycare they have in Scandinavian countries.  Nor can we demand longer paid maternity/paternity leave, paid sick days, etc. because as I keep saying:  there is no free lunch.  The money to find these benefits has to come from somewhere.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002

Hi.  I'm new here (was here years ago) and am now in a good place to discuss this hot topic.  I've been a stay at-home mom for {gulp} 11 years now.  I don't think anyone would be against efforts toward better daycare.  It's just that, the only ways to improve daycare seem to involve money.  In the US with so few social programs and funding available due to the economy, this would mean tax dollars.

I've stayed at-home for 11 years and my husband has borne all of the extra expenses incurred by us not having a second income.  In the US especially, it seems unfair to ask someone (like my husband and I) to then pay more in taxes to help others stay at-home.  We've made the sacrifices, is anyone else helping us out financially?  That's how I see it.  It's a financial question.