Women returning to work

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Women returning to work
28
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 3:02am

This article is about affluent, educated women going back to work. It touches on many of the issues discussed here.



A few snippets:



"The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics found preliminary evidence of affluent women returning to the labor force. When it comes to women with a college education who are 25 to 44 years old and living with a spouse, the proportion of those working or looking for work increased to 78.4 percent in the first half of 2009, from 76 percent in the first half of 2007. Economists say this is surprising because the percentage of people in the work force usually drops as unemployed workers grow discouraged and stop looking for work in a recession."







"Carolyn Bednarz was not as fortunate. The former lawyer at Milbank & Tweed spent nine years at home raising three children, but she became frightened for her family’s future after her banker-husband endured four rounds of layoffs and reduced bonuses.



Ms. Bednarz started looking for work. After a 10-month search she couldn’t find a paying job.



“I probably applied for 30 jobs on Craigslist, and hardly anyone writes back,” she said, complaining that many employers aren’t interested in hiring someone who has not worked in years. “This is just the most humbling experience.”"







"Several studies have found that two different groups of women are likely not to return to work after giving birth: affluent ones and poor ones unable to afford child care.



Sylvia Ann Hewlett, founder of the Center for Work-Life Policy in New York, an independent research group, and several other economists and experts argue that there is an unmistakable trend toward women returning to the labor force — and not just professional women.



“Women are at a watershed moment,” Ms. Hewlett said, pointing to the recession’s squeeze on incomes."






(Studies have found that for every two years a woman is out of the labor force, her earnings fall by 10 percent, a penalty that lasts throughout her career.)


Full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/19/business/19women.html?hp=&pagewanted=all

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 7:08am
an educated woman applying for 30 jobs on craigslist ?

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-06-2009
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 7:15am
craigslist has awesome employment listings, so does monster.com so do any number of on line sites -- reading the want ads is going the way of the dinosaurs. Educated affluent women generally are abreast of current trends in technology and social media -- linked in is a powerful professional networking tool -- those who choose to ignore this new wave of ways to network for employement can find themselves even further behind the curve.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 8:12am

The was an article along the same lines in our local paper recently. Traditional male jobs are the hardest hit in this recession so woman are more and more becoming the primary income earners in their families.

In the article were both families where the wife was already in the work force and some where the wives returned to the workforce but I think they all fit the criteria of your article, college educated and affluent.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 8:36am

They should also know that the best way to get a job is to network. I seem to remember that was beaten into our brains at the work fairs in college. Then they touted that only 10% of professional jobs were hired through the newspaper ads (waaaay before craigslist). I would think it is hasn't changed much since.

There were scads of articles of the college student applying to 100 newspaper ads and getting nada. Then calling one or two people he knew in the companies he wanted to work and VOILA a job!

I would also say a good portion of the "sahm" who are affluent are also "foot in the door" very ptwohms. ON this board they would be classified as wohm, but in newspaper articles, they are generally classified as sahms. So, they don't have a gap and they have active networks in place.

I also see a good portion of the affluent back to work sahms changing careers and starting something different. Usually in something that is more "family friendly" and/or something that relates to a life long passion.

Another way I have seen many previously sahps get back into the workplace is to work part time in a non profit. The non-profit where I volunteer has 6 part time employees (no fulltime). It has been all female, until this spring when the first male was hired. People tend to last 2+ years in the position and then look for fuller time (30-40) hour employment elsewhere. It has been a great launching pad for returning to work educated professional moms. I know we are not alone.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 10:46am

I agree. That has been my experience with the women I know. I actually know very few moms who don't work *at all* and most of them are the ones who still have very young children at home. I know many women who work just a few hours a week (myself included) and others who work 10-20 hrs a week. For a long time, I assumed these women were SAHMs b/c I'd see them at all hours of the day and until I got to know them, never heard them mention anything about working. Once I got to know them, I learned that many of them do work, just not in traditional office jobs.

I'm sure most people have no idea that I work b/c I work such few hours a week and most of them are from home. Most likely, I'd fall into this category you mention: "ON this board they would be classified as wohm, but in newspaper articles, they are generally classified as sahms. So, they don't have a gap and they have active networks in place." I do have a gap though - I did stop after my second was born until just before my fourth was born.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 1:43pm

"Another way I have seen many previously sahps get back into the workplace is to work part time in a non profit."


This is exactly how I did it. And I know several former SAHMs who did the same thing. All of us have entirely new careers resulting from the skills we acquired and networking we did while volunteering at not for profits.


I do hasten to point out that without exception, we all made way more money at our former jobs, though. *L*


My advice to any

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 5:42pm

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I never had that expectation and it surprises me that so many women seem to have that expectation.

As to your point about making way less money than you did before, I'm personally not too worried about that - I worked in the non-profit sector my entire career and never made a ton of money anyway. :)

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 6:24pm

DH tells me i'm welcome back to banking anytime.

 

Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 6:41pm
Agreed. The formerly-high-powered Milbank attorney applying for jobs on Craigslist after 9 years at home is completely unrealistic.
Avatar for mom34101
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Sat, 09-19-2009 - 7:03pm

IME, women who want to make increasingly more money every year don't sah, or if they do, it's because of circumstances, and it doesn't last long.

I really think it's about how long you want to take off, what you've done before you decide to sah, and what you want to do afterward. Most of the professional women I know are pretty savvy about their careers. It's only on these boards where I hear that women are surprised when they can't find a job on craigslist after 9 years at home.

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