Work status and your kid's health

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-09-2009
Work status and your kid's health
183
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 10:50am

Are kids of wohm's less healthy than kids of sahm's?


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33089859/ns/health-kids_and_parenting/


********
Ducky

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-20-2009
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 10:56am
I think that goes case by case like most everything else regarding children of sahm vs. wohm.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-06-2009
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 11:02am
no
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 11:04am
Well, this is probably going to make me sound like the resident snob, but the "less healthy" in this study seems to focus on two factors: the eating of junk food and computer/TV time. I honestly think in my experience, this is a factor of maternal education more than of SAHM/WOHM status. In my experience, mothers who are well-educated are less likely to feed their kids sugary fatty salty junk and more likely to be aware of the benefits of good nutrition, including adequate portions of whole foods, especially fruits and vegetables. Parents with more education (in my experience) are also more aware of the issues associated with excessive screen time, and more likely to monitor and restrict that time, less likely to allow young children to have TVs and computers in their bedrooms, and more likely to be able to afford more stimulating and educational hands on activities. This isn't an absolute, of course, we all know people with M.D.s and PhDs who feed their kids crap and allow them to watch X rated movies, and we also know parents with high school educations who only feed their kids organic whole foods and don't own TVs.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 11:04am

I wonder how big a role culture plays. For example, here in Greece, most kids eat a lot of junk, whether their parents work or not. OTOH, in Denmark, people tend to be more concerned about what kind of food kids eat.

Like this stat:

"The study showed 37 percent of children overall primarily ate crisps or sweets and 41 percent primarily drank sweetened beverages between meals."

Being a Dane I am left wondering how, whether you work or not, you even get the idea of providing sweetened beverages and chips to preschoolers? Also, surely there must be a class element here.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 11:05am
LOL, I am snobbing right along with you just below.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 11:21am

No, but it does make me wonder about the child care in the study.


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 11:23am

I agree, this study is for the under 5 set and I'm amazed that such a high rate of children eat potato chips, drink sweetened beverages between meals and have so much computer/screen time.


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 2:36pm

"Also, surely there must be a class element here."



Yes, and this is the ugly thing no one wants to talk about, at least not here in the US where we sometimes pretend there's no such thing as social class distinction. But of course, there are different social classes. A WOHM who is working as a cashier at Walmart is probably less likely to feed her children healthy snacks than one who is working as a college professor. It's a lot more expensive to buy real dried fruit leather

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-20-2009
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 2:54pm
Judge much?
Do you realize how the economy is and maybe that college professor is working at Walmart as that is their only option in the recession to feed her children?
Do you personally know people who are cashiers at Walmart to make these assumptions?
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 10-01-2009 - 3:50pm

Yes, I do judge and apparently, so do you. But I also want to point out that noticing a difference isn't the same as assigning a value to it. And your post is a perfect example of why we rarely have discussions about class in America:

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