Working Moms Are to Blame...Really?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Working Moms Are to Blame...Really?
21
Wed, 06-05-2013 - 5:08pm

Talk about having to do some fast backtracking:

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant (R) said Tuesday that America’s educational troubles began when women began working outside the home in large numbers.

Bryant was participating in a Washington Post Live event focused on the importance of ensuring that children read well by the end of third grade. In response to a question about how America became “so mediocre” in regard to educational outcomes, he said:

I think both parents started working. And the mom is in the work place.

Bryant immediately recognized how controversial his remark would be and said he knew  he would start to get e-mails. He then expanded on his answer, saying that “both parents are so pressured” in families today.

Read more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/06/04/mississippi-governor-educational-troubles-began-when-mom-got-in-the-workplace/?tid=pm_pop

Huffington Post blogger, Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner, had a good response to it.  She said that it's not the working moms to blame, it's the lack of support of working moms: 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kristin-rowefinkbeiner/working-moms-just-blamed_b_3387089.html?utm_hp_ref=parents&ir=Parents

What do you think of both of their positions?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 11:58am

It's no coincidence 3rd grade is plugged in here, that's when state tests start.  Perhaps that's the tool this governor uses and bases her thoughts on. 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 11:54am
Involved parents costs nothing so forgive me if I'm not impressed by your comments about public funding.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 11:53am

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">pumpkinangel</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;...and yet, both of my kids read well earlier than the end of third grade.  Kids read when they are ready, not because of the parents working status.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>True, third grade does seem a little late.  A lot of third graders are picking favorite authors by then, have started/finished Harry Potter, etc.  That was an odd goal for the Governor to choose.  Maybe it's a function of his home state or a phenomenon of certain states.  </p>

I have heard that third grade is the switch from learning to read to reading to learn, so that's probably where they get that milestone.  And really, reading is a milestone just like walking that has a range that is perfectly acceptable.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 11:50am

pumpkinangel wrote:
<p>...and yet, both of my kids read well earlier than the end of third grade.  Kids read when they are ready, not because of the parents working status.</p>

True, third grade does seem a little late.  A lot of third graders are picking favorite authors by then, have started/finished Harry Potter, etc.  That was an odd goal for the Governor to choose.  Maybe it's a function of his home state or a phenomenon of certain states. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 11:25am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>More than just observations I imagine. </p><p>If you were to poll teachers I think you'd hear similar stories..  A lot of problems in education are b/c of hands off parents, broken homes and parents that just don't care. </p>

Maybe, but what does that have to do with the working status of the mother?  

I would say a bigger problem in education is funding, poor spending of funds and state/federal regulation that requires teacher to teach to a test instead of teaching a child to learn.  But hey, that's just this working mom's observation who is a hands on parent, not a borken home and cares very much about the education of my children.  So much so that I routinely get bashed on this debate board for caring about my children's education and being involved.  So there you go...  ;)

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 11:22am

...and yet, both of my kids read well earlier than the end of third grade.  Kids read when they are ready, not because of the parents working status.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 10:56am

I hope it worked, hands off parents, that is. I think there are extremities on both ends but IME and in many different schools a lot of parents strike a nice balance. I find the complainers to be mostly those less involved however and who loses? Right, the kids do. 

 

 

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 10:42am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>More than just observations I imagine. </p><p>If you were to poll teachers I think you'd hear similar stories..  A lot of problems in education are b/c of hands off parents, broken homes and parents that just don't care. </p>

Some parents where I live must be too involved.  This year, I noticed that 2 teachers arranged for some projects (research and the actual poster making) to be done entirely during the school day.  One teacher honestly told us parents that, she wanted the students to do all of the work.  In other words, she's fed up with assignments done by the parents!  I don't know if it's a function of bored sahps/wohps with too much free time.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 10:35am

I think both are off the mark.  For the working mom blogger, how am I supposed to make working conditions for her more agreeable?   Bosses and owners and such, it just seems like she's asking to be paid the same for less work. 

The Republican politician is partly correct ~ we need more money poured into many of our schools, and both parents need to emphasize education.  Moms working during the day doesn't affect most children because they're in school during the day.  If mom and dad come home from work exhausted, that can be a problem.  It is very tough to review homework when you're exhausted.  But I'm guessing moms take an easier work path after children ~ easier commute, hopefully less stress. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 06-06-2013 - 8:45am
What is the correlation between a mother's employment status and "hands off parents, broken homes, and patents who just don't care?" And what exactly is a "broken home?"