Is The Workplace The New Babies R Us?

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Is The Workplace The New Babies R Us?
120
Mon, 04-06-2009 - 9:34am

What do you think? Should parents be able to bring their young babies to work with them?

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=102774224

baby in clothes basket

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2009
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:37am
How long does it take to pump?
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:39am
Pumped all day before going to work? Did she work nights?
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2009
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:41am

Well since she had all the bottle already made by 9am and breastfeed at lunch, I would assume she had pumped in the morning or maybe the night before?


I don't think she would have needed more than 3 bottles-??

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-24-2009
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:44am

I think she meant that the woman pumped enough for the day in the morning.


The whole pumping thing is easier for some than others.

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:48am

For clarification, are you referring to the idea that children want to be paid attention to? (the alternative is having their needs ignored)

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Most work places *don't* include children. For those places that do have daycare, my concept of it was always that of a separate room where the children are watched, played with, fed, put down for a nap, etc (in other words, paid attention to) by daycare workers while the parents worked, and that the parents could stop by that room or floor to check up on them as needed.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2009
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:49am

Pumping isn't a big deal when it's easy and productive, but that's all dependent on the person.


Very true and if it is that easy for them, then they could easily do that at night or in the morning and not have to take time away from work to stop and pump. IME the woman I work with never did it on work time. I personally saw her bring the bottles into daycare in the morning and saw her leave at lunchtime to go over to the daycare to breastfeed everyday.


iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2009
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 9:51am
Very true. I couldn't imagine just leaving an infant all day long laying on a floor or in a seat and not playing with them, feeding them, getting them down for a nap AND working.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 10:00am

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Someone said that a baby needed attention 24/7 and I'm saying that is simply not true in the general sense with the average child.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 10:06am

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That's what I'm talking about. The baby would need to eat about 3 times during that period, and to keep up one's supply, one needs to pump the same number of times that the baby would eat (probably more, because pumps are less effective than a baby's suction).

If she's not pumping during the work day, then she is most likely making up for it by pumping at night and in the early morning after the baby eats (like a reverse cycler), so again, it would be a royal pain in the behind to pump enough to keep up an adequate supply if not allowed to pump on breaks in addition to during lunch.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-05-2009
Tue, 04-14-2009 - 10:10am

Like most other questions posed on this board, I don't think there is any one answer.

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