Would a longer maternity leave affect...

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-20-2007
Would a longer maternity leave affect...
66
Fri, 06-18-2010 - 11:08am

your decision to be a SAHP or WOHP?

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Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 4:04am

I think it is similar in Denmark, although it may be organized through the "A-kasse," i.e. bundled with unemployment insurance.

The need for temps caused by parental leave is also a good way for young workers to build a resume, and for people to re-enter the work force or change career track. That is how my mother got a job after being a SAHM for 20 years.

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Erica Jong

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 7:46am

chosing to SAH with every intent of returning to WOH when a paid "maternity leave" is over is not SAH IMO.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 8:31am
A 1-year maternity leave at 85% pay would definitely be an incentive for me to remain employed. It beats the heck out of having to choose between leaving your newborn and leaving your job.











iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 10:55am
Yeah, I would be happier about an insurance-like or government-assisted program like that...but she said employer-paid. Many small businesses can barely meet payroll for people they actually have working for them. They certainly can't afford to pay a lot of people who are NOT actively working for them.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 10:56am
How about an unpaid maternity leave? I stayed at home with my babies when they were small for eight months and five months, respectively. How was that not staying at home? I mean, where else was I going?
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 10:59am
OK, I had blanked that bit. I agree that if employers had to pay the leave pay directly, then it would be a problem.

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If you don't risk anything, you risk even more.
Erica Jong

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-17-2007
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 11:21am

I think some of it is mind set. If you know you are going back to work in x months, then you do not necessarily do the same things as you might if you planned to stay for "good". I know I did not foster many new relationships during the time I was home after birth as they would have to end or be curtailed when I went back to work. Instead, I mentioned contact with co-workers (one of which was on maternity leave herself). There were a few groups I did not join because I knew I could only make a few of the activities before I went back to work. There were also a few in the groups that I did attend that were much more standoffish when they found out I wasn't going to be home ft and I was going back to work after 4-5 months.

I see a difference between families that move here to stay and those that move here for a year or two. The ones who move here to stay, tend to put down deeper roots and try to foster close friendships as soon as possible. The ones that move here for a temporary one or two year gig, do not. I see it work the other way too. People here are probably not as open and likely to encourage a tight friendship with someone who will be moving in a year or two.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 11:32am
I didn't foster any new relationships with my older son because I knew that I was going to be moving halfway across the country when he was seven months old, but I stayed home and took care of him. Ironically enough, when we moved, I did join a MOMS club and a playgroup, and a church group for mothers with small children because we moved to a part of the country where we had neither family nor friends and I wanted to meet people with small children. We moved back to Missouri when he was just over two years old. With my second son I didn't foster any new relationships, really, because I already had a network of "Mom" friends. I might have joined MOPS when he was small if I were going to stay home for good, but I don't think SAHM is defined by being a member of MOPS.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 12:11pm
I haven't joined playgroups and made a lot of SAH friends either, and I've been home for 3 years. It's just not my thing. We are a busy family, plus I am new to this area and although I plan to stay indefinitely, I don't know a lot of other people here. We have a few things we go do like free play at a local gymnastics place, and story time at the book store, but we haven't really connected with other people there. I agree with you some of it is mindset, but certainly someone who was home a full year who wanted to forge those connections and have those other activities would do it, while someone like me can be AH for many years and not.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Sat, 06-19-2010 - 1:34pm

funny

 

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