Would a longer maternity leave affect...

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-20-2007
Would a longer maternity leave affect...
66
Fri, 06-18-2010 - 11:08am

your decision to be a SAHP or WOHP?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 06-22-2010 - 1:43pm

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With my oldest, I stayed at home with him for two weeks before working again (because that's how much time there was between the time I gave birth and when fall classes resumed). Was I a SAHM for two weeks? What if I gave birth on a Thursday and classes had started the following Monday? Would I have been a SAHM for those 4 days? How would that differ from when I only worked Mondays and Wednesdays, since in both cases I wasn't being paid during that 4-day period and in both cases I was an employee of the college during that 4-day period?












iVillage Member
Registered: 05-02-2006
Tue, 06-22-2010 - 2:24pm

It would not affect my decision to be a WOHP.

2010 Siggy
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 06-22-2010 - 5:42pm
I already said that state of mind has something to do with it....I am on a nine month contract now but don't consider myself a SAHM the three months I am noot getting paid because I do work about fifteen to twenty hours a week even when I am not getting paid, and I am constaantly thinking about the upcoming semester or the one that is just past. But when you are not on leave, have no responsibilities to an employer and no income, what elsse can you be besides a SAHM. Really, the only thing I did differently because I was plnning on returning to work before my children were weaned is freeze more breastmilk. I would have frozen some anyway to have on hand so I could leave the baby with DH or a sitter for a few hours, but going to work meant I needed a two week supply on hand. Other than that, nothing.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Tue, 06-22-2010 - 11:39pm

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An at-home parent (minus the "stay"), LOL. But I'll go ahead and agree with you there.

When it comes to the issue of long maternity leaves, though, I guess that one's status depends on whether one believes a WOHM is a WOHM because she is employed or because she gets paid, and on whether a SAHM is a SAHM because she is not employed or because she doesn't get paid.

And if one considers BOTH necessary for the title (a WOHM must be both employed and paid to be considered a WOHM), then it creates a bit of a pickle in discussing what to call someone who is employed but not paid. Maybe they're a WOHM because they are employed. Maybe they are a SAHM because they're not paid. Maybe it's not so simple as either one of those. :-)












iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Wed, 06-23-2010 - 8:38am
Yeah, substantially the debate is really on something like, "to what extent can a woman combine non-parental interests and activities, including but not limited to paid employment, and still meet her parental responsibilities and obligations effectively?"
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Wed, 06-23-2010 - 9:46am

It's an interesting question. For me being paid is an important component. When I was on maternity leave I didn't consider myself a SAHM. I had a job, I just wasn't there. I was getting short term disability pay and just like if I was out for knee surgery, I still had a job, was getting some pay, and considered myself a working mom. I also used up all of my vacation, and when I was a WOHM I didn't consider myself SAH when I was on vacation. I feel I became a SAHM when I quit my job. But I always planned to go back to work at some point, SAH was always a temporary proposition for me. It being temporary didn't preclude me from being a SAHM because the temporary period was not short, it was 3 years. It just means I am a SAHM with a plan.

I think if I had a year long maternity leave where they were holding my job and I was paid, I would consider myself a WOHM who was SAH for a year. Hybrid title.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Wed, 06-23-2010 - 10:04am

The way I see it if you have a job that you are expected to report to then you are WOH. The length of time before reporting does not change that.

I don't work over the weekend and I am not paid over the weekend but they expect to see me on Monday morning. I am not unemployed, I am having a break in that employment.

When I worked for the school system I was off for the summer. They expected to see me when school resumed. I was not unemployed, I had an employer. I was having a break in that employment.

The same would hold true for maternity leave. If both I and the employer had the expectation that I would be returning to that job at some point then I would be WOH on a break. I have an employer. If I left that job with no expectations of returning to it then I would be SAH regardless of the length of time because I would have no employer.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Wed, 06-23-2010 - 10:10am
I think we are in agreement then.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Ten Rules for Being Human


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"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Wed, 06-23-2010 - 10:19am

But, IMO anyway, maternity leave has little to do with work status.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-04-2008
Wed, 06-23-2010 - 10:25am
If I had the option of 1 year home at 85% I would definately stay home for that year, and make up for the difference with freelance consulting if

  &nbs

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