your expectations of your nanny/DCP

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
your expectations of your nanny/DCP
42
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 8:24am

following on from a question from Tina about how much time a SAHP actually spends 100% engaged with her child in an average day....


When you pay someone, a professional child carer of whatever ilk, nanny, DCC, in home DC or whatever, what do you expect to get for your money in terms of their focus on your child(ren)?


Do you expect them to spend a lot of time engaged with the child and providing activities and stimulation and education?

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Avatar for mkatherine
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 9:27am

well Liza went to a large daycare center where she was the only infant for a long time, then was in the "toddler room" then the "big kids room"

 

Yes. We. Did.

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-24-2007
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 9:36am

>>i don't think a bored kid is cause for a nanny cam or a call to CPS ;-)<<


A DCC setting is so different than a SAHM with an only child, or a SAHN (my new acronym! SAHnanny) with an only child.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 9:47am

Our expectations have changed with the ages and schedules of the children.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-29-2002
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 9:55am

If I am going to pay someone to care for my child, then I expect them to do their job 100% of the time I am paying them.

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Registered: 01-05-2000
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 10:34am

Dylan was one of up to 12 children (one of 2 pre-mobile infants and one of 4 under 2yo). It was a family dc. Dylan got a family atmosphere where his needs were met as an infant; where they held him as much as they could while caring for the other children. As he got older, there was story time, free play time (both indoors and outdoors), arts and crafts, cooking, pre-school activities, holiday themes. He got the same care and attention that he would have gotten at home if he had been born closer in age to his sisters and we were still homeschooling. She does the same things as I did while taking care of the kids--doing yardwork, reading the paper, doing the crossword puzzle while watching the kids during outdoor time; reading, quilting, sewing, etc. while the kids are taking their naps in the afternoon. Taking care of kids for up to 10 hours a day requires at least some down time to recharge the batteries whether you're a dcp or a parent. Especially if there is more than one child involved.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 10:35am
I will honestly say that I don't want my child to be engaged in activity 100% of the time even if I did have a sah nanny.

iVillage Member
Registered: 07-23-2003
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 10:43am


VERY well said.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 07-26-2007
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 11:18am
I chose a home daycare provider because I wanted a home-like environment. I expected the provider to care about her kids and be able to bond with them in the long term (and they with her). I expected her to provide age appropriate activities, but not hand-hold them through it during the entire day. I expected the kids to spend the bulk of the day in play activities with any "curriculum" as a more of a guide-line, theme, rather than sitting the kids at tables and drilling them classroom style. I expected my kid to come home happy and dirty and tired. I expected that home maintenance that the provider needed to care for during the day would be cared for to her ability without neglecting the kids but also without worrying if the kids are playing amongst themselves for 30-45 minutes. (or during nap time if the chore was a longer one).

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"BTW, I hate Lifetime. Their movies will suck you in and all of a sudden you've watched 3 in a row, used every tissue in t

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Registered: 09-04-1997
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 11:35am
I was very happy with the set-up I had with my daycare providers...during a typical day I'd bring my child in around ten am, and she had two hours of structured activities, "art" followed by "class" (or was it the other way around?) based on some theme she had chosen for the week such as "rain forest" or "wild west" or "the circus." She'd feed 'em lunch and then they'd go outside on all but the very nastiest of days for awhile to run off lunch, and then they'd have "quiet time" for about half an hour. Most of the time the under threes would be asleep at the end of quiet time and would nap until about 3, when they'd get up, wash hands, go outside and play for an hour or so and then come in and have a snack before I picked them up. On Thursday afternoons she would take the kids to swim lessons in the summer and they had a gymnastics bus that came to the daycare during the cooler months. On Friday afternoons the kids who didn't nap usually had some kind of an outing, even if it was just a trip to a neighborhood park, or the library, or something simple like that. She had an employee who stayed at the house with the under twos and only the "big kids" -- 3s through 5s, got to go on the trips.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Wed, 02-27-2008 - 12:02pm

This is actually part of the reason we

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