About parenting, education, violence, etc

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
About parenting, education, violence, etc
90
Thu, 03-27-2014 - 10:39am

My daughter and her class were asked to find a number of arguments here, The transcript is longer than this 3 minute video and it touches on a few issues we have tossed around here.  It's pretty cool to me that a teacher is wanting students perspective about this and as I await her return from school to tell me how it went today I wanted to take this to the board, How real is this IYO/E?  Are parents in or out of the loop about their childrens lives?  How do children get a proper education when their lives away from school contradict that?  Thoughts?  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Gh3_e3mDQ8

Dislaimer, Cosby is known for stirring the pot when he speaks but this is not a minority issue.  Kids are thinkers and I commend her teacher for asking them to think outside the box here.  

 

 

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Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 03-29-2014 - 12:35pm

n

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Registered: 03-22-2013
Sat, 03-29-2014 - 1:18pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>So just insults but no real answer to my post?  Lol. Thats cause you look stupid too putting up false things. Lololol</p>

wow.  Call me when your insults aren't so pathetic a 6 year old would be too ashamed to resort to them.

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Registered: 12-22-2013

Sorry your insult did not pan out lololool

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Registered: 05-31-2011

litlmiss_cantbewrong wrote:
I thought it was Jams who said this wasn't racial.  I don't know how you could separate race from this speech.  The speech was at an event commemorating Brown vs. Board of Education.  Whoever said it wasn't about race should actually look up what that lawsuit was, because they must not know.

Bill Cosby seemed to be addressing those people of his own race in the lower SES that live in neighborhoods full of poverty and crime. I did not see any evidence that Bill Cosby was addressing all of those living in crime and poverty stricken neighborhoods.

I'd be sad and disappointed if my kid read this transcript and somehow concluded that it wasn't about race. 

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Registered: 05-31-2011

The Pound Cake speech was given by Bill Cosby in May 2004 during an NAACP awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. Did the teacher lay out the context of the speech? A rich black man who lived through Jim Crow, desegregation, and the 60s civil right movement who now blames blacks in poverty for their own unemployment and racial achievement gaps?

The speech is not applicable to a middle class high school students unless discussed in the context of intended subjects and audience.

If this teacher wanted to discuss poverty, violence, education, and entitlement without regard to race this was a pretty poor place to start.

*****

Goosebumps, Ms. Hooligan. I got goosebumps. 

If one of my kids had brought this speech home to analyze without the context, they would have been the recipient of a 2,000 word email rant (filled with words like "irresponsible" and "potentially dangerous" and "propoganda") that could have been condensed to your post, basically.

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Registered: 05-31-2011

jamblessedthree wrote:
The kids were asked to pick apart the speech not decide if Cosby is just some rich black guy with something to say. Unlike you, kids are likely to be less bias and the teacher wanted perspectives about culture from her class which I found intersting. That's too bad you're so closed minded.

So the kids were asked to pick the speech apart and all come up with the same conclusion? No room for variance in the opinions? Why would that somehow equal an interesting assignment?

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Registered: 05-31-2011

bordwithyou wrote:
Picking apart the speech legitimately involves identifying the social location and authority of the speaker.  I like Cosby.  He spent the first half to two thirds of his career basically ignoring race, this gaining some cachet amkng whites.  If you look closely at  his show, though, he did gradually sneak in some lessons about black history, black culture, and political issues of interest to the black community.  He did a lot to identify and define the black middle class/professional class.  He's given millions to historically black colleges and this speech was as an elder in the black community to a mostly black audience.  I do think there is an element of blaming poor people for being poor here, but overall I think it's a good piece to think with.  We t in the midst of a Great Forgetting, not only among blacks who do not always honor the struggles of their grandparents and great grandparents, but aming women who reap the benefits of the feminist movement while eschewing the feminist label.

I had a geography instructor at the community college who went off on tangents often, mostly because when he saw a boundary on the map, he was excited to share some of the political and social history that helped to form its shape. Before and after class, a lot of my classmates would express that they hated his droning on. This man was sharing a lifetime of knowledge and understanding as an added bonus to teaching about water tables and coordinate systems, and many of my peers were simply too young to see the real value in it. I always walked away from that class feeling sad. I personally felt as though I gained a new perspective out of his class, even though it was a simple geography course. He sparked interest in economics and history and I'm now an avid lover of geography today because of it. A true educator. 

I feel the same way about some of the posts here. They're lovely informative, synthesized from a large knowledgebase, packed with the kind of insight that only a serious student of humanity could give. Some of us are listening, but others are obviously not hearing a thing because their inner monologue of "BLAH BLAH BLAH" is simply too loud. You can't even hit their radar because these students are so naive that they don't even know what they don't know. 

Sigh.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-30-2014 - 10:46am

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>Sorry your insult did not pan out lololool</p>

Noddiing in agreement.  And I think cartoons and captions have seen better days, I miss thardy...

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-30-2014 - 10:47am
Quite the contrary marla. Not everybody in public school is expected to think alike, YMMV.

 

 

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Registered: 05-31-2011
Sun, 03-30-2014 - 10:50am

jamblessedthree wrote:
Quite the contrary marla. Not everybody in public school is expected to think alike, YMMV.

Then why the resistance to the mere presence of Chestnuthooligan's opinion?

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