All Pinked Out

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
All Pinked Out
12
Mon, 10-28-2013 - 5:10pm

I was racking my brains since trying to remember where I ran across an advice column from a breast cancer survivior who is fed up with the pink movement since it was mentioned in another thread:

 I have been in remission for breast cancer for about four years now. I was fortunate to have good health insurance and a supportive network or friends and family during my treatment and recovery. Every October I grapple with the same problem: I feel no loyalty or desire to help out with breast cancer awareness funds. To be quite blunt, I find most national campaigns to be impersonal, they do not score very highly on the charity calculator, and they were not there for me when I was suffering. I am also not particularly interesting in doing any of the 5Ks or other events in October. I find the best way to help breast cancer sufferers is to donate and volunteer at the local level. Every year I get a lot of inquiries if I am participating in different campaigns or activities and when I say no, there is always a bit of an awkward pause. I don't really want to get into why I choose to support the local level more than national, and I don't want people to think I am insensitive to the needs of those with breast cancer. What is a good response to their inquiries?

Read her response at: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/dear_prudence/2013/10/dear_prudence_i_m_a_breast_cancer_survivor_who_thinks_national_breast_cancer.html

Any thoughts on the pink movement?

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Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 9:33pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>The author is a breast cancer survivor and feels the best (or only thing) she can give is to donate or volunteer.  That's not the way all survivors or sufferers feel.  Some may want to simply be among others who've experienced the same thing, maybe they want to see professional male athletes wearing pink wristbands on the football field.  No one can tell people how to mourn or how to get thru such an experience.</p>

Nicely written thardy.  These handful of threads about a topic that people deal with and cope with so differently isn't even debatable to me. 

November is diabetes awareness month, show your blue!  :-)

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 6:38pm

The author is a breast cancer survivor and feels the best (or only thing) she can give is to donate or volunteer.  That's not the way all survivors or sufferers feel.  Some may want to simply be among others who've experienced the same thing, maybe they want to see professional male athletes wearing pink wristbands on the football field.  No one can tell people how to mourn or how to get thru such an experience.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 4:18pm

savcal2011 wrote:
<p>Nodding to Empty and Rolls, but want to add my own $.02.  While I agree that breast cancer needs funding and research and a "cure", the same can be said for *all* cancers.    While I think it is good that breast cancer gets a lot of funding, there are many other types of cancer that tend to get forgotten about because the whole world thinks pink.   I understand that breast cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, and that by sheer number of victims and affected families it is going to have more support than some of the less common cancers.  But we need to be careful about being so pinked out that lung (the #1 cancer), colon/rectal (#2), pancreatic (#4), prostate (#5) and the other types don't get "forgotten".</p>

Totally agree. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 3:29pm

I am skeptical of all indirect giving campaigns. The ones that really irk me are the ones run by retailers ("click to add a dollar to your bill to save a homeless pet/cure cancer/feed a child.") It makes more sense to just eliminate the middle man and give directly to the charity, after first checking it out to be sure it's reputable and that the majority of donations go to research or care or wherever I think they should go. I'm not going to buy some overpriced red shirt from the Gap just to feel charitable or wear a pink hat so people will think I'm such a caring person.

I don't have a problem with the raising awareness campaigns or the charity races (which can be fun), but I know the real money comes from direct giving. The chief value in awareness campaigns is exactly that, awareness, especially for the younger generations who may not take their risk of cancer/AIDS/STDs seriously. But as a fundraising tool, they're not the most efficient way to channel money where it needs to go.

Avatar for Cmmelissa
iVillage Member
Registered: 11-13-2008
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 12:57pm
I wanted to add childhood cancer to your list.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 11:00am
Another thought. I am in more support of awareness campaigns when the target demographic is older kids or young adults. Such as Pink Out Week at the local HS. Teenagers probably don't have a high enough level of awareness of breast cancer. Teenagers sometimes haven't been exposed to "support your fellow man" campaigns on a peer level. So I think those campaigns are much more effective for that age group then for older adults.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 10:49am
"While I think it is good that breast cancer gets a lot of funding, there are many other types of cancer that tend to get forgotten about because the whole world thinks pink." ------- Another very good point. Agreed!
Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 10:12am

Nodding to Empty and Rolls, but want to add my own $.02.  While I agree that breast cancer needs funding and research and a "cure", the same can be said for *all* cancers.    While I think it is good that breast cancer gets a lot of funding, there are many other types of cancer that tend to get forgotten about because the whole world thinks pink.   I understand that breast cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, and that by sheer number of victims and affected families it is going to have more support than some of the less common cancers.  But we need to be careful about being so pinked out that lung (the #1 cancer), colon/rectal (#2), pancreatic (#4), prostate (#5) and the other types don't get "forgotten".

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 7:48am

Empty, well said and I agree with you about the research point.

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Tue, 10-29-2013 - 7:29am

I have one small difference of opinion from the OP.  The way to help cancer victims is in research which it not at the local level.   Research is what will cure cancer. Instead of buying pink things in which only a small portion may be going to charity and you do not really know which charitly, do your own research into which organization are really helping and make a direct donation to them in addition to any local help you give.  

But I think that no one should be telling  a cancer victim how they should feel about "pink", that includes other cancer victims but especially those who have not had the battle. 

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