Any experience w/ speech delay?

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Any experience w/ speech delay?
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Fri, 10-17-2003 - 10:41am
We had Alex's two year checkup which went fine except that the ped. feels he is speech delayed. Alex is a reactive speaker instead of an expressive speaker. He knows the words but he doesn't say them. He follows commands and he knows what we are saying. For some reason, though, he doesn't feel the urge to speak. If he wants a drink, he brings us a Capri Sun and we fix it for him. If he is hungry, he either gets in his highchair or he stands by the frig. We read to him and we speak to him alot.

I find it quite ironic that two people who were English majors and express themselves verbally have a child that doesn't speak often. Our oldest never had this problem-he spoke too much. I am calling a speech pathologist to come in but I wanted to know if anyone has experience with reactive talkers. Do they eventually start talking more? Should we force him to say drink before we let him have a drink? Is he going to be one of those people that just doesn't talk that much and you have to pull information from him? I really can't imagine. I have never won a game of quiet mouse in my life.

Kristi

"I do not want to be a princess! I want to be myself"

Mallory (age 3)

      &nbs

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 11:22am
Hi Kristi:

Did the ped tell you that cognitive understanding (receptive speech) is totally different from speech itself? One of my SILs is a speech pathologist and Alex's delay is quite common. I would highly recommend a few sessions with a speech expert. He or she can teach you how to best handle his "therapy" apart from Alex's formal sessions.

What were his weight and height? Any shots? We don't go for Joey's until next week.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 11:37am
He was 26 pounds and 35 inches. I really think he is taller but he was struggling and screaming so the nurse just marked the sheet by his head and by his feet. The boy hates to be messed with-poor thing.

He got a flu shot since DH is on chemo and he has asthma. I made DH hold him since I am always the bad guy. The ped. also wants us to use Pulmicort for his asthma but we aren't going to do it. I know I am paranoid but it has been on the market for a short time and some of the lab rabs developed brain tumors from the Pulmicourt. I am not willing to take the chance with DH's condition. I have outlined my reasons for not using it before so I just nodded and plan to put him on Singulair (which is what his asthma doctor recommended)

It was a good visit and I plan to call the TEIS people on Monday to arrange an appt. for his speech evaluation. I feel so bad that he is not speaking like it is something I did wrong. Mommy guilt even though I know it has nothing to do with our parenting.

Kristi

"I do not want to be a princess! I want to be myself"

Mallory (age 3)

      &nbs

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 11:42am
Stop that guilt!! It has absolutely nothing to do with your parenting or DH's condition. All you need is more guilt/stress in your life - NOT!

Petey was on pulmicort for 5 months and it really helped (but he was too young for Singulair). I'd go with the specialist's recommendation anyway.

Alex is nice and tall. I don't know Joey's exact stats, but at 2, Peter was 33 pounds and 33 inches LOL!!!

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Avatar for mjdphd
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Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 11:50am
He is not a first child, is he? In my experience, second children often do not speak as early as first children. One issue is that the first child does a lot of the talking for him. He gets along just fine all of the methods that you described. He seems to understand, right? Have you had his hearing checked to make sure that isn't a problem? Sometimes children with delayed speech have hearing problems. I also know of a young girl, the niece of my MIL, who wasn't moving the muscles around her mouth properly. That can be diagnosed by a speech pathologist. My own daughter, a second child, didn't speak much until 2 years old when I took her pacifier away. Just rule out any physical problems such as hearing or muscle movement, and you will probably find that your son just hasn't felt the need to talk. These kids are perfectly fine and when they do start talking, you won't be able to shut them up LOL. I think it has more to do with the second child syndrome than anything else. Good luck.
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Registered: 08-29-2002
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 11:56am
Oh good grief!! And here I was SO proud that Helena finally made it to 32 lbs last week....she'll be 5 in January.

Laura

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 11:57am
My 4 year old is 43 pounds now LOL!! Helena's a beautiful name BTW.

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Registered: 08-29-2002
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 12:01pm
We had the "second child syndrome". Ds starting speaking at 12-18 months and was putting together complex sentences by the time he was 2. Dd, on the other, was barely saying anything at 2 and was barely managing even 2 word sentences when she was 2.5. We were quite worried about possible speech delays. At around 2 years 8 months, she suddenly hit a huge developmental leap in language and was speaking full, complex sentences in within a couple of months. It might be a true delay so it is well worth seeing a speech therapist, but chances are he just hasn't felt much like speaking yet.

Laura

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Registered: 08-29-2002
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 12:06pm
Ah! I forgot about your kids, the giants :-). Lorenz is just now about 48lbs and is 8.5 years old. We had the hardest time picking names for the kids, I have to say. They had to be easy to spell and equally easy to pronounce in both English and German (and Swedish) in order to keep ALL of the relatives happy :-). Helena was always a favorite name for both of us.


Laura

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Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 12:07pm
We never got to the therapist. I had made friends with a woman who lived downstairs from us when dd was born. Her son was a month older than dd, and my new friend was a speech therapist. By the time both kids were 2, the best you could get out of them was a grunt. My friend insisted that I needn't worry. I had made a painstaking list counting every syllable dd uttered as a "word", including counting different meanings of the same syllable as separate words. Even with these neat little tricks she had about 20 "words" at 23 months. For some reason my ped was not concerned. This may have been because dd screamed non-stop at every single visit, and the ped just wanted us OUTTA there. At one visit the ped did ask dd to name these little plastic Disney figures, but since I didn't allow any Disney in the house, dd had non clue. When I explained this to the ped, she just gave me the look.

On dd's 2nd birthday she started talking, extensively and in full sentences. She hasn't quit since. About 6 months later she came in the kitchen where I was working and said, "mama, do you remember when I couldn't talk well?" I said I did, and she replied with great emphasis, "I did NOT like that." So, I think she waited to talk until she felt she could do it satisfactorily.

All that said, it seems sensible to get the kid evaluated. Sometimes, a child may have some problems "feeling" his tongue in his mouth, for example, and that can make it difficult and frustrating to talk. After the eval, you can always decide if you want to go ahead with therapy or not.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 10-17-2003 - 12:09pm
Hey my 4 year old is only 50th percentile in weight and 25th percentile in height - not even in the top half of the population (in the U.S., anyway).

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