An apostrophe tutorial

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
An apostrophe tutorial
25
Thu, 06-10-2010 - 9:02pm

Ashley, the Grammar Hag, would like to remind you of the rules for using an apostrophe properly. Failure to follow these rules will result in the removal of the apostrophe key

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 06-10-2010 - 11:15pm

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apostrophe

That should help by giving some graphic illustrations. Plus I totally <3 The Oatmeal. :)

(there's also a really good on for the semi-colon)

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon

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Kitty

"Adultery isn't a mistake. It is a choice to give your loins greater importance than your dignity." --From the Awesome Files of B

Meez 3D avatar avatars games

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Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 2:01am

May I join the hag ranks and add:

There are two cases in English. The nominative case and the objective case.

The nominative case is used for subjects of verbs and predicates of the subject.

The objective case is used for objects, direct and indirect, of verbs and prepositions.

The cases only affect the forms of the pronouns. Some pronouns in the nominative case would be: I, he, she, we, they, who. The equivalent pronouns in the objective case: me, him, her, us, them, whom.

Therefore it is incorrect to say: "Bob gave it to dh and I." There is a preposition "to" which governs the noun and pronoun coming after it, so it should be "to dh and ME." Likewise, it should be "Bob gave dh and me a present." Not: "Bob gave dh and I a present."

It is also incorrect to use "whom" and "whomever" as subjects of sentences. "Whom" is not a fancy version of "who." It the objective case form of "who."

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If you don't risk anything, you risk even more.
Erica Jong

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 7:33am

Hag submission #2:

It is: "He is prejudicED/biasED." NOT: "He is prejudice/bias." It is the past participle of the verb "to prejudice" or "to bias" used as an adjective.

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If you don't risk anything, you risk even more.
Erica Jong

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-10-2009
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 10:59am

I super puffy heart you.


Add this tip to the tutorial, about the use of apostrophes and "it".

Avatar for mommy2amani
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 1:24pm

And your child didn't get 4 A's and 3 B's on her report card.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 1:44pm
Actually, *my* children, being blood relatives of the Grammar Hag, got straight As, but yeah, I get your point.
Avatar for mommy2amani
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 2:42pm

LOL!

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Fri, 06-11-2010 - 9:59pm

I also feel the need to include this helpful tutorial on plagiarism.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mwbw9KF-ACY&feature=player_embedded

************

Kitty

"Adultery isn't a mistake. It is a choice to give your loins greater importance than your dignity." --From the Awesome Files of B

Meez 3D avatar avatars games

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 06-12-2010 - 4:39am
That was cute.

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If you don't risk anything, you risk even more.
Erica Jong

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Sat, 06-12-2010 - 12:13pm

That was hilarious. I would love to share it with my 15 yo daughter (indicating, of course, that I did not discover the video on my own) so that she can pass it along to her English teacher, but she is upstairs studying for her hellish poetry final and I dare not risk having my head bitten off.


(Last sentence intentionally ended with a preposition.)

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