Are you on time? Are your kids?

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Are you on time? Are your kids?
361
Mon, 04-22-2013 - 5:49pm

Do you arrive for work, doctor appointments, social events, etc on time?  What events (if any) warrant being early for?  Is there anything you purposely show up late for?  Explain. 

How about your kids? 

 


 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:32pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I have, you refuse to read the posts.  I can't help that.  </span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="text-align:left">Nope. It is ok though. You are not familiar with being "casually" or "fashionably" (as Lauren has stated) late. We are all different and run in different circles and have different social lives.  </span></strong></span></p>

Well, it's all there if you want to read it.  :)

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:31pm

<<We are discussing kids in general, not specific information about our own children.>>

....and parental actions.


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:30pm

<<I'm surprised the whole kids party stuff went this far considering how off limits kids were in the first place, Aren't you? >>

Ah, not reading the posts, I'm speaking of my actions as a parent, perhaps you missed that in your eagerness to make another passive aggressive comment in bias debating?   


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:30pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">pumpkinangel</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&amp;lt;&amp;lt;&lt;span&gt;Social graces are not dead.  Things have changed since Emily Post.&amp;gt;&amp;gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span&gt;Of course they have....but I still believe that invitation is to those invited, not whomever they wish to bring.  I wouldn't take my kids to a wedding if they weren't specifically invited as regina mentioned earlier and I wouldn't have my kid take me to a party if I wasn't specifically invited.  I think that is a basic social grace, do you disagree?&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>No one's mentioned bringing someone along to a party who wasn't invited.  And I commented that invitations are less formal than writing cards by hand, mailing them and waiting for a formal response.  </p>

It seems to me we have two different customs:  The "it is understood that only the kid is invited unless specified otherwise" crowd, and the "the whole family is understood to be invited" crowd.  I don't understand why anyone is either getting the vapors or assuming an air of superiority because someone else's social circle does things differently.  Personally, although I remember enjoying them very much at the time, I am quite happy that my days of throwing children's birthday parties are over, or at least on hiatus until such time as a son and daughter-in-law ask for my assistance.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:29pm

DD1 wants a sweet sixteen party, I'm considering renting some place or the Y rec room. We'll see...

Uggghh...I know, next year is the big year here too. lol. Soooo expensive. We have talked about taking one of her friends on a cruise with us. Not sure yet. Too much to think about right now. lol.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:27pm

<<What help? If the party is out, the parent of the child does NOT do anything. They have the people at that place do everything. Sounds as if you are not familiar with these type of parties.>>

1.  Never stated the type of party.

2.  Stop assuming.

Please explain then as you said you don't stay so how do you know how the party is run?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:26pm

<<My bad, that was RG that was judging parents who stay as "crashing" the party. lol>>

And it was you that was judging those that didn't.  Crashing is a definition of a word, look it up.

<<So no examples of parties? Why? I gave mine. Maybe because you haven't attended them so you don't really remember what they were or what they did at them :>>

No, it's because there is someone who likes to take specific details about posters and stalk them and their kids, including facebook and I don't want to give specific details.  I'm sure you understand.  But assume away, you haven't been right yet today.  ")



PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:25pm

This is another clear case of not reading the posts properly.  I (and others) are calling it crashing a party when one is not invited but stays at a party, which you know, would be the definition of crashing a party.  You are talking about a party where parents are invited to stay, which of course is not the same thing as what you quoted and others are talking about.

To break it down.

1.  Parent not invited, stay = crashing a party.

2.  Parent invited, stay = not crashing a party.

See the difference?  Please oh please tell me you see the diffrence and there isn't another 100 posts that are not read!

What you are NOT getting is that the parent NEVER has their name on the invite. So according to you and RG they are crashing. In "our world" they are NOT crashing. They are simply being the parent and they are staying at the party, which the parent of the child does not mind. At an outside party (and sometimes inside as I have been to parties that have them) parents don't usually have to do most of the work as there are hosts that do that. Are you not familiar with this? Have you had bday parties for your children? Did you have hosts to do everything?


iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:24pm

pumpkinangel wrote:
<p>&lt;&lt;<span>Social graces are not dead.  Things have changed since Emily Post.&gt;&gt;</span></p><p><span>Of course they have....but I still believe that invitation is to those invited, not whomever they wish to bring.  I wouldn't take my kids to a wedding if they weren't specifically invited as regina mentioned earlier and I wouldn't have my kid take me to a party if I wasn't specifically invited.  I think that is a basic social grace, do you disagree?</span></p><p><span><br /></span></p>

No one's mentioned bringing someone along to a party who wasn't invited.  And I commented that invitations are less formal than writing cards by hand, mailing them and waiting for a formal response. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:23pm

<<And you never said that you WOULD enjoy seeing them having fun with their friends and learning new things.>

I told you then and I'm telling you know, that is an outright silly assumption to make based on dropping off at parties.  Read the posts.

<<I never said helping parents so not sure where that came from. >>

I think Jam said it, sometimes the assumptions flow to fast back and forth, I can't keep up with who said which assumption when.

<<Umm..yes, in my world it is all about the kids too. You are assuming that it is about the parents because no one has ever blinked an eye that a parent would stay. We all enjoy watching what our kids do with their friends and again, each party has a different situation to it. You are bundling about 15 years worth of parties together. lol>>

What?  

PumpkinAngel

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