Are you on time? Are your kids?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Are you on time? Are your kids?
361
Mon, 04-22-2013 - 5:49pm

Do you arrive for work, doctor appointments, social events, etc on time?  What events (if any) warrant being early for?  Is there anything you purposely show up late for?  Explain. 

How about your kids? 

 

 

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iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:18pm

springfever2013 wrote:
  A bunch of sites do it, them being one. I have no interest in linkedin as I am not networking and no need to publish my information. I have been at my job 18 years tomorrow so not looking for another one. I understand some people jump around a lot so they need that site.</span></strong></span></p>

Congratulations!  That's like a marriage. ;)

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:15pm

[quote=jamblessedthreeSnickers has said she stays for her child.  But a mother that stays to help and socialize is crashing, That kind of rude isn't welcome anyway.</p>[/quote]

ReginaGeorge?  I don't know how I would feel about that if I was hosting and had not intended parents to stay.  Honestly.  It's manic enough to entertain a dozen or more kids in my house/yard.  We've had children with peanut allergies here as young as 5 and 6 for playdates/parties.  Moms have stayed home.  They usually have other kids to care for.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:15pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">pumpkinangel</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&amp;lt;&amp;lt;&lt;span&gt;No one's mentioned bringing someone along to a party who wasn't invited.  And I commented that invitations are less formal than writing cards by hand, mailing them and waiting for a formal response. &amp;gt;&amp;gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span&gt;Yes, actually that is what many of us have been talking about in this thread....parents staying when they weren't invited.&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I haven't "seen" that here.  How can any parent stay if she's not invited?</p>

I don't think they're going to kick you out of a bowling alley or a skating rink if you don't have an invitation.  As for the home parties, I have never had a problem with a parent wanting to stay, but I have been put in positions where the parent brings the kid and there's a sibling there, and the parent asks,  "I hate to put you on the spot, but Jimmy really likes (baseball, skating, horses), and I was wondering if he could stay, too."  I think it's terribly rude, but it would be ruder still for me to look at the six year old and say,  "No, there's no room."  We just set an extra plate, and I practice my "smiling while seething" trick.  As I said, I am quite glad to be done with all of that.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:10pm

pumpkinangel wrote:
<p>&lt;&lt;<span>No one's mentioned bringing someone along to a party who wasn't invited.  And I commented that invitations are less formal than writing cards by hand, mailing them and waiting for a formal response. &gt;&gt;</span></p><p><span>Yes, actually that is what many of us have been talking about in this thread....parents staying when they weren't invited.</span></p><p><span><br /></span></p>

I haven't "seen" that here.  How can any parent stay if she's not invited?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:08pm

bordwithyou wrote:
  It seems to me we have two different customs:  The "it is understood that only the kid is invited unless specified otherwise" crowd, and the "the whole family is understood to be invited" crowd.  I don't understand why anyone is either getting the vapors or assuming an air of superiority because someone else's social circle does things differently.  Personally, although I remember enjoying them very much at the time, I am quite happy that my days of throwing children's birthday parties are over, or at least on hiatus until such time as a son and daughter-in-law ask for my assistance.</p>

I haven't seen the superiority part.  I've just seen comparing customs.  I will say what's missing is that, if the parents aren't included on the invite ~ as in "And the parents are welcome to stay and have some cake too"  ~ the parent dropping off does have to go out of her way to see if she's invited. Wink  I have brought "Johnny" up to the front door to make sure I know what time is pick-up.  Then, I might be invited to stay and I decide based on what other obligations I have.  I'll be honest about that ~ sometimes that's how groups of parents stay and that's how *I* can become better friends with them.  It's not a written invite in advance, but rather verbal from the kid's parent. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:07pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Now, see, this would be a perfect time for me to insert the kind of rude comment about limited experience that your threw at PKA for no good reason.   But what purpose would that serve?  We've all had plenty of experience at birthday parties, and it's clear they do them differently in different areas, and it's all good.  Except, of course, when it's not.</span></p><p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="font-size:x-small"><span>How so when I have said I have had parties out, parties at home, been to parties out, been to parties at home, dropped off kids at parties out and dropped off kids at parties at homes? </span></span></strong></span></p>

Yet, you were unfamiliar with the "party at an outside venue where there are no hired hosts included," which is actually kind of common here.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2013
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:01pm

Now, see, this would be a perfect time for me to insert the kind of rude comment about limited experience that your threw at PKA for no good reason.   But what purpose would that serve?  We've all had plenty of experience at birthday parties, and it's clear they do them differently in different areas, and it's all good.  Except, of course, when it's not.

How so when I have said I have had parties out, parties at home, been to parties out, been to parties at home, dropped off kids at parties out and dropped off kids at parties at homes? 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 4:01pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Doesn't linkedin do that?</span></p><p><span style="font-size:small"><strong><span style="text-align:left">A bunch of sites do it, them being one. I have no interest in linkedin as I am not networking and no need to publish my information. I have been at my job 18 years tomorrow so not looking for another one. I understand some people jump around a lot so they need that site.</span></strong></span></p>

I'm not familiar with that site but wouldn't you have to be on it to know if someone is looking?  

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:59pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:small">Clearly you missed my written comments about verbal or written invites?  I have mentioned it numerous times in posts here that "I" would not attend a party without a verbal or written invite...sometimes that verbal invite was issued when "I" rsvpd.  I could have sworn you quoted those comments and therefore read them.</span></p><p><span style="font-size:medium"><strong>That is great. Again, this is different in my circles. No invite needed, written or verbal. It is just assumed that you can stay. </strong></span></p>

That's great....something I have said all along now. 

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Tue, 04-23-2013 - 3:58pm

springfever2013 wrote:
<blockquote><div style="font-weight:bold"><em>jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>Snickers drops in now and then like spice girl does, But they're not chums.</blockquote><p style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"></p><p style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I'm sorry, I don't understand.  Can you explain, this time without rudeness, please?</p><p style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"><span style="font-size:small"><strong>Where do you see rudeness in this post? bawahhhaaaa......</strong></span></p>

There wasn't any rudeness in THAT post.  The rudeness was the last time Jambles was asked a question, and rudeness ensued.  

Your cackling response is unseemly.

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