Calling all teachers and anyone

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Calling all teachers and anyone
36
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 2:50pm
else who cares to comment.

If a teacher tells a parent that her child should be tested for "impulsivity," is that code for "I think your child has ADHD but I can't tell you that directly because you might sue me"?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 7:34pm
i totally agree. my 20yo has ADD, and as you know, usually the studies of ADD and ADHD go hand-in-hand. i was trying to recall if i actually knew this or if someone just ran it by me, but i think you just confirmed the fact that ADD/ADHD is tough to diagnose before the age of (6) as i remember. plenty of toddlers behave this way as you said, but, and i am in no way a professional to diagnose *anything*, the symptoms to me sound much like autism. dont mean to scare you p&j, just keeping the realms of the issue opened. i have two friends whose sons are mildly autistic and have said, if one is not aware of the autism, one might think he(usually boys) is just a spoiled brat. these are friends who know nothing of each other, and whose autistic children are ages 20yo and the other one is around 7yo. it is also known, autistic children in general are born to upper middle class professional parents, but they are not sure why this characteristic stands out.

i have to say, every time i hear of someone with a little one who cant sit still during circle time, i have to laugh out loud, as my ds1 could never sit still, and when approaching middle school, i said, i dont think they will let him roll around on the floor in middle school.....and they didnt, and thats when all the real fun(very sarcastically said) began.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 7:49pm
yes, but none of us want to hear anything "negative" about our children, although it is often a relief to have an answer. i know they dont test for ADHD before 5, but personally, i would not rule out general psychiatric/psychological testing, as there are plenty of disorders that do appear before that age, and it might be worth the investigation considering if there is an issue to be treated and can be treated with early intervention, she would have a good jump on it.

i think we all jump on the ADD/ADHD band wagon, as it is the current days' issue, but there are disorders that are not so common with very similar symptoms, as in my cousin's little boy. he has a condition i cant even begin to remember and not sure i could pronounce it if i could remember what it is called, but his symptoms are parellel to ADHD.

what i think the teacher is trying to tell the mom is, something is not right, but im not sure what. i dont think it is illegal to say "your child should be tested for ADHD/ADD", but i think teachers are afraid of the reaction from the parent. personally, when the 7th grade teacher asked me if i ever had my son tested for ADD, because she saw every symptom she knew of in him, i wanted to hug her neck, as finally i hit one who didnt "pussyfoot" around the issue.

if nothing else, that mom should badger the he!! out of the school system for help. i ended up having him privately tested which cost gobs of money, because i didnt know i had the legal right for help. live and learn. my ds2 is treated very differently, as i am all the more wiser(is that a word?) for it now.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 7:52pm
i agree, but 96% of kids with ADD/ADHD are gifted.

how does his being gifted make him "hyper", or vise versa? not being ugly, truly curious to the answer.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 8:02pm
oh, you dont have to be a teacher to be sure. my son had gobs of teachers who did nothing but complain about him. nobody ever said, "mrs... would you mind if we set up an appointment to have your son evaluated?". that would have been heaven, but they just did not want to be bothered. i live in a city...of state#48 in edcucation...if that tells you anything, where it is more important to build sports arenas, against the voting of the citizens, than build much needed schools. and our superintendent of schools some years back got on tv and said, and i quote!! "we are going to lower the standards of our testing, as to make them within reach of more children". WHAT????? this is an educator??? maybe though you live in a state which actually values education, therefore the teachers are willing to go the extra mile for the children who have disabilities we are unable to see with our eyes.

ok, im coming down off my soap box......(as she takes a bow)

oh, sorry back to your question of "impulsivity". is that not simply a symptom of many things?

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 8:03pm
excellent post!
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iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 8:57pm
Being gifted doesn't really "MAKE" him hyperactive, but he gets bored waiting for everyone else to finish their work and finds himself something to do. Now-the things a 6 year old "finds" to do often involve movement and activity. So he was hyper in the classroom. According to the psychologist who tested him he is a bit hyperactive, but does not meet the definition of ADHD. She thinks he will learn to channel his activity down as he gets older.

Since we had his staffing meeting (to get him admitted into the gifted program) his teacher is more aware of his needs. When she sees him drifting off into Zack's world she gives him something else to do. She has also been giving him longer reading assignments to keep him occupied for longer periods of time. Teachers can often know that there is something off about a child, but not be able to put a finger on what it is. Testing is one way to accomplish that.

However, I believe OP is talking about a much younger child (Zack is nearly 7). And I don't think you can get an accurate read on a learning problem at age 3 or 4. Kids are just to variable at that age.

Jenna

Avatar for 1969jets
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 9:00pm
Well my state is worse! Florida is the pits for public education.

Jenna

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 9:12pm
How right you are. Typically boys are overlooked when it comes to being gifted. The reason is that they are typically less verbal than girls, giving people the idea that they aren't really that smart anyway. Boys tend to be labeled as troublemakers and are less likely to be tested for being gifted. Also, they tend to handle their giftedness in a more physical way than girls. Girls tend to be chatter boxes.

My brother was the troublemaker in his class for MANY years before they figured it all out. My dd is the chatter box!

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-2003
Thu, 05-22-2003 - 9:34pm
When i tell a parent that their child is "impulsive" i generally mean that the amount of impulsivity/attention getting behavior is well beyond that of what i would find in a "regular" child at that grade level. It means that I think the parent might want to pursue it, because that kind of behavior makes for a difficult learning environment for the student, other students and the teacher.

But honestly, when i say it, i'm not NEARLY worried about being sued -- don't know how you could sue me for just "suggesting" the label AD/HD, but the fact that if *I* specifically say that *I* think he/she has AD/HD, then the district/school is financially liable for ALL of the follow-up testing by the parents' specialists....and those tests can run into the thousands of dollars.

For us, the elementary school's psychologist put in her report a statement that allowed us to have our son tested for AD/HD and "other" disorders -- and that one statement allowed ALL of it to be covered by insurance (over $1,000).

However, I can suggest to a parent that they might want to "think" about an AD/HD evaluation -- and knowing that I have MY own child with AD/HD (in addition to teaching MANY others) that seems to carry some weight. But since I am NOT a doctor, I can not diagnose AD/HD.

Eileen

iVillage Member
Registered: 11-20-2001
Fri, 05-23-2003 - 6:49am
I have to laugh, my brother and his SO were approached three months ago with that very statement. They agreed to testing ... and come to find out, my 7yo nephew(first grade) is not impulsive nor ADHD ... he is very bright and BORED. LOL ... have your ds tested.

Linda

 

Linda - wife, mother, grandmum                     &nb