Can I start a verbal Pet Peeve thread???

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-29-1999
Can I start a verbal Pet Peeve thread???
64
Wed, 12-22-2010 - 8:25pm

Can I just say that I hate the use of the word "gift" as a verb?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2009
Wed, 12-22-2010 - 10:02pm

this:

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-16-2010
Wed, 12-22-2010 - 10:03pm
irregardless
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 1:16am

Yes I hate it when people mess up that one . . . the moot point.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 1:17am

And when people say (or rather type) click instead of clique.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 3:46am

Yes, you most certainly may. Here goes:

Something is definite. When you turn an adjective into an adverb, you add -ly on the end. You do not suddenly respell the whole word. Thus, the adverb is DEFINITELY, not definately.

Effect and affect are two different words and both can be used as either verbs or nouns:

The president hoped to effect a major change in the educational system. It was his hope that this change would affect the lives of many children in a positive manner.

Me is a perfectly good word and should be used in the following examples instead of I or myself, because it is an object of either a verb or a preposition:

Bill drove Bob and me to the store. That is between you and me. He gave the gift to my husband and me. He made my husband and me see the problem.

When you use a verb in an adjectival or predicate function or as the participle in a composed verb, then the verb needs either the -ing ending or the -ed ending. Therefore:

He is prejudiced. He was used to doing it.

You cannot use the past tense as a participle in a composed verb form. So it is:

I should have gone to the store, NOT: I should have went to the store.

The comparative and superlative forms of bad are worse and worst. The expression is "in the worst case ..."

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 3:49am

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 4:25am

Turning 'sk' into 'ks' and vice-versa is a standard shift in Indo-European languages. Just saying. Apparently you also get the pronunciation 'aks' in some british dialects.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 5:33am

Ditto, although around here, we all correct each other. Dh and I often correct each other, we both correct the kid and sometimes she corrects us. We all have English as our second language, yet that is what we speak with each other, so that may be why.

Dh and I will also sometimes have ongoing battles over points of grammar, with dictionaries and grammar books being pulled out for back-up. For example, I am still, with the support of good old Fowler, trying to convince dh that it is perfectly ok to place an adverb between the auxiliary and the participle in a composed verb. He thinks "he had quietly gone away" is wrong and that it should be "he had gone quietly away." He is, of curse, completely wrong

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-01-2009
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 7:30am

Having worked for both a Humanities nonprofit and a Literary Arts nonprofit

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-22-2009
Thu, 12-23-2010 - 8:38am
verbal... na ah...it drives me bonkers and ideer sounds just like it is spelled. Idea, they drop the a and add the r.

As for computer error...not my place to say...

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