CSAs revisited

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
CSAs revisited
9
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 1:28am
So based on geschichtgal's comments, I looked up local CSAs last spring but was too late to join. But I got on the mailing groips of some and then someone else on Another board mentioned buying her meats from local farms. So I looked up some of those and have joined a meat CSA for the winter. It's pretty pricey on a per pound basis, but not excessively so. I joined for ~7 lbs of meat, one whole chicken, and two dozen eggs per month, for three months which came to just under $250.

Anyone else doing meat CSAs, or have produce they put up from summer CSAs, or any interesting CSA stories?

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 7:23am
We don't have any meat CSAs around here, but my brother found a farmer with a pig we could buy. He and his wife, my parents, and my family split it three ways, so I have a third of a pig in my freezer. Also, my uncle raises cows (on the same farm where my mom grew up) and offers one to my parents each year. It's too much meat for them to eat, so the past couple years we've split it. So, I have freezer full of locally raised pork and beef in the winter.

I love our veggie CSA. The family that runs it set up an online ordering system that is amazing. I can customize my box each week depending on what we like and what we plan to cook and what is in season. It's just awesome. I wish I could find one that went over winter. I think there are some vegetables that should grow around here with appropriate covering over winter and some thing that should store over winter.

I canned some elderberry jelly, elderberry peach preserves, peach salsa, applesauce, and tomatoes (these are almost all gone already :( ). Usually, I get some green beans from my parents to can, but the crop didn't turn out this year. I'd really like to find some better sources for local bulk produce for canning purposes.

I'm glad I inspired you to check out a CSA!
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-27-2000
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 9:14am
We split a pig last year with another family but decided not to do it again. There were too many cuts that we didn't like or want to make it cost effective for us. My kids don't like ham, apparently, so the ham steaks were a waste on us. I also gave away the ham roast. I realize that aside from pork loin/tenderloin, pork chops and bacon, I'm not much into pork either. In fact, I've come to realize in recent years that I've become very selective about what meats I like. And while I do like meat, I don't love it. Dh, otoh, does. I,m much happier with seafood, veggies, some poultry (selective there too) and pasta dishes.

I haven't done a vegetable CSA because my kids are too picky unfortunately. Dh can be a little picky there too although he has expanded his palate quite a bit in that regard since we got married (he didn't ever eat eggplant, spinach, squash and, until the other night, cauliflower). We have a garden in the summer /fall and grow as many of our favorite things as this region allows and get the rest from farmers' markets and roadside stands.

I looked into getting a weekly delivery of locally grown/produced items that a local shop organizes but it was just way too expensive for our family of six ($8/lb for chicken breast for example).
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 1:12pm

IT's not a meat CSA, but there's a farm near you that sells meat from livestock raised locally.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 1:32pm

I loved our CSA. (We're moving to another town, so that's why it's in the past tense.) They were all organic, everything was grown right here in town, plus they had eggs, grass fed beef, and honey from other local producers. We paid $750 for 20 weeks of excellent produce. I occasionally had to buy garlic and onions from the grocery store, but mostly tried to use only what we got in our share.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 3:22pm

Elderberries grow almost like weeds. COnsider putting in a few bushes in your yard. In Denmark we make a summer drink from the flowers and also beignets with the flowers. The berries we make into a syrup and drink it diluted with hot water as first aid against colds, asthma and throat infections. Apparently it really does work.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 11:28pm
They are weeds around here ;) I asked my dad last year if he knew of any growing in the woods around his house . . . So, this year he picked a whole bunch and made juice. He gave me two quart jars and I made a ton of jelly and preserves out of it. I read a blog from someone living in France, and she does all kinds of fancy things with the blossoms. I'd love to plant a couple in my yard though. They'd go really nicely with the blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and strawberries I'm trying to grow.
iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 11:32pm

There are a ton of meat producers around here. It's too hilly in many areas for the kinds of corn and soybean fields you see in a lot of the surrounding states, but it's perfect for livestock. There are 5 or 6 meat producers that sell their meat at our farmers market. I can buy chicken, duck, goose, turkey, beef, lamb, goat, and pork. The farmers' market has started moving indoors and opening once a month (instead of once a week) for the winter, which is great for restocking meat purchases.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Fri, 11-11-2011 - 11:36pm
Yeah, locally produced meat is expensive. We offset the cost by eating meatless meals several times per week. We also have fun learning different ways to prepare cuts of meat that we wouldn't necessarily buy if we were going to the grocery store to pick it out. The beef from my uncle is mostly cut the way I grew up eating it, which makes it a little bit easier. Roasts, steaks, and ground beef are pretty easy to use-- even the tough cuts can be nice if slow-roasted.

I am little bit worried about the pork we got-- the packages are pretty big for the size of our family.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 11-12-2011 - 3:24am

Oh cool! That is what we do in Denmark, forage for them. Even better.