Education OUTside the womb?

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Registered: 02-24-2009
Education OUTside the womb?
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Thu, 05-07-2009 - 12:58pm

When your kids were small, 0-5, did you do anything to "train" them, prepare them for school etc. Were you concerned about "stimulating" their cognitive development? Did you have those Baby Einstein videos? Flash Cards? Foam letters in the Bath tub, or did you just let them make mud pies?

Did any of your concerns in this area influence your decision about SAH/WOH or type of daycare?

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Registered: 02-22-2007
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 1:17pm

I didn't have them on a curriculum or anything, but I read to them a lot. They obviously heard whatever music we had on in the house, and that was often classical, but it was also jazz, folk, rock, hip hop, etc. ODS in particular was/is very artistic, so as soon as he could hold a pencil or crayon, and manipulate play-doh, we let him have at it.

Then again, I also baked and gardened with them, so I am sure that any benefits they might have gained were totally eliminated by my foolish choices.

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Why hide your light under a bushel of bears, I ask you?

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Why hide your light under a bushel of bears, I ask you?
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 1:28pm

Yes, They are clearly doomed by the combo of baking and lack of a proper program, lol.

Dd also has an artistic bent. Given my own upbringing (we had two toys: pen and paper, ok, three, we also had lego), it never occurred to me to restrict access to art materials. I remember being baffled when I discovered that one of my friends only let her kid "play" with crayons under controlled circumstances and rarely at that.

I did not have a program either, nor flash cards or videos. Dd did come with me to Latin class sometimes and was quite taken by the recitation of irregular verbs- fero, tuli, latum etc. When I told her English had such verbs too, "doing iwweguwar verbs" became a favorite game for a while. So, at 2 dd could recite the principal parts of many verbs, but nonetheless said things like "you buyed it yesterday." So much for trying to jump the gun on normal language development, lol.

I read to dd at bedtime every day, but not otherwise except as a special treat. I had to make that rule at some point because else she would try to make me read all day and throw a fit if I refused.

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Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 1:51pm

We read a lot, sing the ABC song, count to 10 or 20. She has a couple of puzzles with numbers and letters. When she says something that isn't grammatically correct, I try to rephrase it correctly in my answer. We talk about animals and what they say and where they live. We also point out what color things are. I try to make sure she minds her manners. I *gasp* bake with my DD and we count the number of cups of flour or sugar or whatever. She plays with play dough and loves stickers. She is fairly good at drawing snakes. However, I don't do any of this to "stimulate" her cognitive development. It's fun for her and it's fun for us to see when she learns something and moves onto the next thing.

Her daycare does basically the same thing. They sing songs, play outside A LOT, do puzzles, play with play dough, etc. I forget the name of the curriculum, but basically it's a learn through play type of thing. If they did any kind of flash cards or anything I would move her to a new daycare.

baby in clothes basket
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Registered: 12-07-2003
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 1:52pm
At one point, DD wanted us to read the same books over and over all day long. We made a rule that we would only read each book one time per day. At least then there was some variety!


Edited 5/7/2009 1:53 pm ET by geschichtsgal
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 1:59pm
Yep, free outside play was one of the things I considered a must when choosing a preschool/daycare.
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Registered: 01-15-2006
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 1:59pm

i wish i would have saved,pat the bunny.

 

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Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 2:03pm
With dd it was sometimes the same books, but just as often it was just that she wanted me to read to her for 3 hours straight if she could get away with it. It was a bit obsessive and I had other things to do. Since she did not deal well with being thwarted, it was simpler to have a blanket rule.
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 2:05pm
What is Pat the Bunny? I liked Curious George too, but I nixed Dr. Seuss. I could not stand reading that nonsense out loud.
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Registered: 01-05-2000
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 2:08pm

Nope. Kids learn best at their own pace when participating in family life. As we went about our day, we talked to them about what we were doing and included them to the best of their ability and age.

Chris

The truth may be out there but lies are in your head. Terry Pratchett

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Registered: 03-23-2009
Thu, 05-07-2009 - 2:12pm

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