Fat Tuesday

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2013
Fat Tuesday
59
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 11:20am

1. Are you giving up anything for Lent?

2. Did you go away for college or stay home and commute? Did your/will your children go away or commute for college?

3. Do you have a certain time you turn on or turn off your heat for the season?

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 4:57pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I think there is something valuable, at least for the first year, for a student to live in university housing.  They tend to make more friends on campus and be more involved in campus activities and out-of-class opportunities such as freshman interest groups if they live on campus.   After the first year, I would be open to other living arrangments, but I think on campus communities are a good idea for first-year students in all but commuter campuses.</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I agree if it is far away from home. 15-20 minutes away, not sure if I would think the money would be worth it as you can still be involved (even hang out at the dorms with new friends you make and do things with these new friends as I would give more freedom at home for that) and not have to pay the dorm and food fee. </span></strong></p>

How are you going to simulate a dorm like experience in your home?

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 5:20pm

1. Are you giving up anything for Lent?

Nope.

2. Did you go away for college or stay home and commute? Did your/will your children go away or commute for college?

I didn't live at home, but I stayed in the same town.  It was my deal for getting to go to Germany for a year between high school and college.  I have no idea what my kids will do.

3. Do you have a certain time you turn on or turn off your heat for the season?

I turn it on when it gets cold and turn it off when it gets warm.

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 5:23pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">My daughter goes to college about 30 minutes from here. She lives on campus. </span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Can I ask why she doesn't just commute? I have heard some stories lately of kids staying at schools that are close to their homes, some just 15-20 minutes away. Doesn't make sense to me to go that close and not stay home.</span></strong></p>

Financially it would often make sense for the college child to live at home. But it's not all about money.   MAny kids need the independence of living away from mom and dad. Also, there is an experience of living on campus (or in off-campus student housing) that is, to me, an huge important component of a college education. Something that can't be gained or experienced while living at at home.  These are two of the reasons we didn't pressure The Girl to go to school here.   Financially it would make sense for her to do so; but it will serve her better longterm to "go away".

Some other reasons -- Some kids need to live in a community that has common goals.  Some households would be a distraction to the college student. Some parents would still treat the college student like a child. 

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 5:28pm

bordwithyou wrote:
I think there is something valuable, at least for the first year, for a student to live in university housing.  They tend to make more friends on campus and be more involved in campus activities and out-of-class opportunities such as freshman interest groups if they live on campus.   After the first year, I would be open to other living arrangments, but I think on campus communities are a good idea for first-year students in all but commuter campuses.

Looking at the people I went to high school with who went to the local university, I think the people who lived in the dorm the first year and apartments afterwards tended to do better in school and finish more quickly than those who lived at home.  I've had quite a few family members for whom that wasn't the case though.  I'm glad I stayed in the dorm my first year, rather than living at home.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-22-2013
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 6:23pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p>1. Are you giving up anything for Lent?</p><p>2. Did you go away for college or stay home and commute? Did your/will your children go away or commute for college?</p><p>3. Do you have a certain time you turn on or turn off your heat for the season?</p>

1. Nope.

2. Nope.  Nope.

3. Nope.

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2013
Tue, 03-04-2014 - 6:32pm
    blackandwhitemolly wrote:
    <p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I think there is something valuable, at least for the first year, for a student to live in university housing.  They tend to make more friends on campus and be more involved in campus activities and out-of-class opportunities such as freshman interest groups if they live on campus.   After the first year, I would be open to other living arrangments, but I think on campus communities are a good idea for first-year students in all but commuter campuses.</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I agree if it is far away from home. 15-20 minutes away, not sure if I would think the money would be worth it as you can still be involved (even hang out at the dorms with new friends you make and do things with these new friends as I would give more freedom at home for that) and not have to pay the dorm and food fee. </span></strong></p>

    How are you going to simulate a dorm like experience in your home?

    Where did I say I would or could in my home?

    iVillage Member
    Registered: 05-31-2011
    Tue, 03-04-2014 - 6:36pm

    Both my husband and I currently commute to school. We live in a beautiful area to do it--four state universities within 50 miles. DSS and DSD currently attend community college; I'm not sure that DSS is interested in pursuing more than an associate's degree. Depending on her path (not 100% certain yet,) DSD will either finish up completely at the community college or transfer and live at home, because of the baby.

    DD is set to graduate high school next year, a year early. She's been dual-enrolled at the community college since her freshman year. She'll already have a good start. She'll likely live at home and finish two years at the community college because she's already got a scholarship for it. I'd like to send her to a university to live on campus when she's ready to transfer, though, even if it's just one of those conveniently-located state colleges.

    DS starts high school this fall. I've applied into an early college for him. If he's accepted, he'll spend the next five years earning his high school diploma and an associate's degree at the same time. If not, he'll attend the same charter as DD and dual-enroll, possibly making a run for the same outcome. (A handful of students have graduated the school with their associate's degree.) I'm not sure what the rest of his education will look like as it will depend on what kind of program he decides to pursue. He really loves physics and is giddy at the sheer thought of astrophysics, so maybe he'll move away to some exotic campus, or maybe he'll just stay home with mom and dad and commute to the University of Michigan. We won't know for a few years :) 

    iVillage Member
    Registered: 08-22-2009
    Tue, 03-04-2014 - 6:37pm

    blackandwhitemolly wrote:
    <p>1. Are you giving up anything for Lent?</p><p>2. Did you go away for college or stay home and commute? Did your/will your children go away or commute for college?</p><p>3. Do you have a certain time you turn on or turn off your heat for the season?</p>

    1. Do not do Lent.

    2. I did not go to college,  My DDs went away to college.

    3. No., we go by need not a date on the calender.  Some years we turn it off and on throughout the winter if it has been a mild winter. 

    iVillage Member
    Registered: 02-24-2010
    Tue, 03-04-2014 - 6:43pm

    blackandwhitemolly wrote:
    <div style="color:#111111; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, Helvetica, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size:13px; font-style:normal; font-variant:normal; font-weight:normal; text-align:left; text-indent:0px; text-transform:none; background-color:#ffffff"><div><ul></ul></div></div><div style="border-bottom-color:#cccccc; border-bottom-width:1px; border-bottom-style:solid; color:#111111; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, Helvetica, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size:13px; font-style:normal; font-variant:normal; font-weight:normal; text-align:left; text-indent:0px; text-transform:none; background-color:#ffffff"><div><div><div><blockquote><div style="font-weight:bold"><em>blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;I think there is something valuable, at least for the first year, for a student to live in university housing.  They tend to make more friends on campus and be more involved in campus activities and out-of-class opportunities such as freshman interest groups if they live on campus.   After the first year, I would be open to other living arrangments, but I think on campus communities are a good idea for first-year students in all but commuter campuses.&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;I agree if it is far away from home. 15-20 minutes away, not sure if I would think the money would be worth it as you can still be involved (even hang out at the dorms with new friends you make and do things with these new friends as I would give more freedom at home for that) and not have to pay the dorm and food fee. &lt;/span&gt;&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote><p>How are you going to simulate a dorm like experience in your home?</p><p>Where did I say I would or could in my home?</p></div></div></div></div>

    You didn't say you would or could.  You did say this though:

    From Bord: We think that the independent living experience is valuable for 18-22 year olds.  If my younger one decides to go to school locally, he will still live on campus.

    From Molly: I do too. I just think it is a waste of money to live on a dorm that is so close to home. I would rather give them more freedom at home, being in college, and take that money that would have been spent on a dorm and food plan and give it to them when they graduate, get a job and start off.

    PA may be saying that since you said in this post that it's important, but do not intend to provide that because it's a waste of money.  You just say you will give them more freedom, which would be natural if they were college students living at home.  But it's not the same as living on your own.  Not bad, not good, just not the same.

    “Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
    ― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

    iVillage Member
    Registered: 06-27-1998
    Tue, 03-04-2014 - 9:08pm

    blackandwhitemolly wrote:
    <div style="color:#111111; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, Helvetica, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size:13px; font-style:normal; font-variant:normal; font-weight:normal; text-align:left; text-indent:0px; text-transform:none; background-color:#ffffff"><div><ul></ul></div></div><div style="border-bottom-color:#cccccc; border-bottom-width:1px; border-bottom-style:solid; color:#111111; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, Helvetica, Geneva, sans-serif; font-size:13px; font-style:normal; font-variant:normal; font-weight:normal; text-align:left; text-indent:0px; text-transform:none; background-color:#ffffff"><div><div><div><blockquote><div style="font-weight:bold"><em>blackandwhitemolly</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;I think there is something valuable, at least for the first year, for a student to live in university housing.  They tend to make more friends on campus and be more involved in campus activities and out-of-class opportunities such as freshman interest groups if they live on campus.   After the first year, I would be open to other living arrangments, but I think on campus communities are a good idea for first-year students in all but commuter campuses.&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left"&gt;I agree if it is far away from home. 15-20 minutes away, not sure if I would think the money would be worth it as you can still be involved (even hang out at the dorms with new friends you make and do things with these new friends as I would give more freedom at home for that) and not have to pay the dorm and food fee. &lt;/span&gt;&lt;/strong&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote><p>How are you going to simulate a dorm like experience in your home?</p><p>Where did I say I would or could in my home?</p></div></div></div></div>

    You didn't, which is why I asked the question.  The question follows your comments that talk about living on campus if close to be a waste of time, a waste of money, that you would just give more freedom at home, more freedom to do things with new friends like in a dorm room....all so that one wouldn't have to pay for a dorm room and food.   All of these were used to counter the point that there was a purpose in living on campus, if it isn't your intent to compare the two, why are you comparing the two?

    PumpkinAngel