finding an agent for my potential book?

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
finding an agent for my potential book?
12
Wed, 08-26-2009 - 5:12pm

I am writing what I hope will become a young adult novel. It is not complete, and I do not intend to try to sell it until I think it is done, but I would like to know how to find an agent.


There is a lot of misinformation and there are many scams out there, so I would appreciate hearing from someone who has BTDT.


I don't want to self-publish--if this isn't good enough to get published by a legitimate publisher, I don't want it to see the light of day. So far, though, my "reviews" from my teenage audience are pretty good. At least they laugh in all the right places.

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Wed, 08-26-2009 - 5:41pm
I don't know, but good luck! How exciting!









Photobucket




iVillage Member
Registered: 03-06-2009
Wed, 08-26-2009 - 9:37pm

you don't need an agent to get published - it can help but isn't necessary -
the best thing you can do is head down to Barnes and Noble and get c opy of Writers Market -- the bible for all writers
also pick up the latest issue of Poets and Writers
If you haven't had ANYONE read , critique or edit the book do so -- find a writing group- sign up for mentor or peer review at your states writers organiziont ( nearly every state will have one, contact your state arts council for referrals) it's absolutely imperative to have already gone through one solid editing round before submitting work.
develop a tough skin. Editing is not for the faint of heart.

get to know your market, find out who publishes young adult fiction, look up their guidelines for submission. It just takes a little research and a LOT Of hard work and elbow grease.

when i was running the NH Writers Project I used to tell people who would call me and say "manuscripts done how to do I publish it?" that no publisher is waking up that mornign saying "oh I hope THIS is the day Bob's manuscript lands on my desk"

the best thin YOU can do is get to know the market, the business, how to write a good query letter, howto submit sample chapters etc etc before even starting.

good luck and don't hestitate to ask if I can be of more help.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Wed, 08-26-2009 - 9:57pm

Yep, listen to crusadergal - It may be hard to imagine based in my incoherent posts here, but I do a lot of writing on the 'net. Some good, most very bad, but I have a targeted audience that some think I could do the traditional publishing route.

They are my harshest critics and my best fans. I've got a novel mostly complete that 100s have read. I'm thrilled with that. Find a community that works for you.

Your expectations may be higher, but I found an audience on the net that interactively works for me.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Wed, 08-26-2009 - 10:18pm

Thanks so much! I have a pretty thick skin when it comes to ruthless criticism. I did write for a living for years--and one of my editors was a...well, you know--but this is my first attempt at trying to publish some fiction.


I

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Wed, 08-26-2009 - 10:23pm

Oh, I think everyone writes in a different voice here at iVillage than they do in other places, so it isn't hard to imagine you writing on the net.


I've also published some, um,

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 08-27-2009 - 7:30am

I have not BTDT, unfortunately, but I have worked in the book industry and if I were in your shoes, I would start scouring the interwebz to find out who decent authors in the same genre have for agents.

Another resource is Books in Print. It is a reference work, available at the library, and lists all kinds of industry information about the book business, including agents. The listings for the agents usually specify genres and also give submission requirements.

Also talk to everyone you know. If you can get a personal intro to either an agent or an editor, then that is often the best place to start, even if that person does not end up taking on your project.

Last but not least: 1. Dum spiro spero, it may take MANY attempts. Being turned down 10, 20 or 30 times does not mean your book is bad. 2. Do not just send it out cold to publishers. They will not look at it, I assure you. When you send it to agents, make sure to follow their submissions guide lines.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-06-2009
Thu, 08-27-2009 - 8:03am

I'm going to disagree slightly -- if you target your publishers carefully and find a good division of

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-27-1998
Thu, 08-27-2009 - 9:51am

Thank you! Tracking down the agents of popular YA authors is a very good idea. And I do know who many of the top YA writers are, since DD and DS's rooms are overflowing with their books.

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Thu, 08-27-2009 - 10:26am
You may well be right. It is just that often people do not do their homework and send it cold to any house that seems remotely likely or to the very big publishers, for example. Unless you have some kind of lead, it is usually a waste of time. As you say, following submission guidelines is HUGE, whatever you choose to do.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Thu, 09-10-2009 - 12:59pm

if i remember right they have one called,artist market too.

 

Pages