Friday Five

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Friday Five
161
Fri, 03-08-2013 - 10:01am

1.  What did you last eat

2.  What is for dinner tonight

3.  What is the most expensive piece(s) of furniture you own and how long have you had it

4.  What is your clothing style

5.  What are your weekend plans

 

*Don't forget to change your clocks ahead this weekend*

 

 


 


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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 10:29am
I have the Pfalzgraff French Country stuff. We didn't register when we got married. Instead, we had a huge garage sale to get rid of duplicates and triplicates when we were combining homes.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 10:32am
A friend of mine collects cows, it's cute. I collect angels and have them scattered throughout my house, Some are wall hangings with sayings like, Angels sent from above please protect the ones we love... I know, sappy Lol but I'm an incredibly sentimental person.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 10:37am
I think it's stupid to register if you've been living together or are on a second or third marriage, I know that's not what you're saying but that's what comes to mind.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 11:18am

puss_boo_kay wrote:
A lot of the Ikea space-scapes that they feature in the catalog are insanely cluttered--all open storage and crammed with stuff.  I get the point; they're demonstrating storage options for really small living spaces, but I can't even imagine actually living in one of those spaces with all the open storage.</p>

I think this is the biggest reasons I have such a fondness for Ikea. We have a little house and a lot of people in it. ~1600 sq. ft., currently 6 people. It's all about maximizing the efficiency of every square inch here. I don't have room to maintain a six-person dining set, but I can spare a space on the wall to hang a few easily-accessible foldup chairs or stools for the nights we all eat together so it doesn't feel cluttered 24/7. (In a house like mine, empty dining table chairs hold up bookbags, purses, shopping bags, stacks of folded clothes that didn't make it that last ten feet, etc.)

There's something about the open storage that seems to make a space feel more productive. Does that make sense? Maybe it's just me. One of my husband's many hobbies is art and due to space restraints he had to pile all of his supplies into a small bookshelf. When that started overflowing, we picked up two of these and a stack of these to hang from the rail, giving him a place to store brushes, sketching pencils, clay scultping tools. Once that was set up, he seemed to produce more art. I think there's something compelling about things like that being open. It removes the hurdle of setting everything out for use and clean-up. It's already out, it's ready to go, and there is no excuse. Just walk up and paint.

I think the kitchen is another great example. The number of milkshakes and smoothies prepared in my kitchen vary dependent on the location of the blender. I had put ours away in a cupboard for several months and when I dug it out recently it was used several times. One kid was even like, "we have a blender?" Once it was out of sight, it was forgotten. So by keeping it on the counter, I encouraged the kids to use it, at least through a novelty phase, and it's the same with dh and his art supplies. When things are prominently displayed they're alluring. 

After watching everyone use the blender the way they did, I hung an everyday frying pan next to the stove and kept placing the most-widely used sauce pan on the stove after cleaning and watched the kids in my house start cooking at the stove rather than opening cans and cooking in the microwave. Dss was content before to eat spaghettios every night he had class. Now, he's been coming home experimenting with things like fajitas. I'd prefer to keep my pots and pans put away, but if it's encouraging more healthy meals and encouraging the kids to take an interest in cooking, I'll take it. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 11:24am
Well, just for he record, my husband and I were not living together, this is my first and only marriage, and I would never call anyone else's decision "stupid." I always buy a gift when I receive a wedding invitation unless I know the couple would prefer no gifts.
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 11:27am

I wouldn't mind the rail and hangie things in the sewing room and I think that may even provide me some storage solutions for my bathroom when I renovate, but in the opening living spaces, I get really physically stressed by lots of visual clutter.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-07-2003
Sun, 03-10-2013 - 4:24pm

bordwithyou wrote:
Well, just for he record, my husband and I were not living together, this is my first and only marriage, and I would never call anyone else's decision "stupid." I always buy a gift when I receive a wedding invitation unless I know the couple would prefer no gifts.

When my coworker got married, he and his now wife had about 4 households worth of stuff (which is now mostly in boxes in their basement).  He had complained about having way to much stuff, so I ended up giving them a gift card to the coffee shop they visit every morning.  They've been married about a year and are slowly starting to get rid of some stuff.  He's always offering random appliances to our student workers, which is quite nice for them.  :)

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 5:30am
Lol, Excuse me while I pick myself off the floor, Never call others decisions stupid? But yea, I'm likely to buy a gift regardless of a registry too, I'll even get a gift if we're not invited to a wedding depending.. DH's nephew got married last Summer and we weren't officially invited but I sent them something anyway.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 7:35am

Let me qualify my statement. I would never call anyone's decision whether to register or not register for gifts "stupid. Maybe tacky, if they registered for expensive trips or something. But mostly, I trust that people know whether registering is something that works in their situation. Maybe it's a couple where the ex-wife got all the nice things in the divorce settlement. Or a couple who never owned a home in their first marriage getting married and buying a home and registering for a few things for their home. Nobody is obliged to use a registry, but some people appreciate the registry option. I just went to a baby shower for a woman having her 7th child and I was amazed at the snarky things people said when the hostess persuaded her to register for a few things. Baby #7 was a surprise - they had gotten rid of their baby furniture and had to get all new strollers, crib, high chair, etc., plus the nice things they did have were all girls' clothes and a few "special" toys and books they were saving for grand kids. It had been 16 years since they had a boy, so it really was like starting over. I was all, "Jeez, buy some crib sheets or don't buy some crib sheets, but shut up about it already."

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Mon, 03-11-2013 - 7:57am

I am still trying to decide what to do about the DD of our neighbors.

We have always been more friendly neighbors than friends.  The younger DD is a year younger than DD3 so they played some as kids but that did not carry over to their teenage years or adulthood.

It is her second marriage but the first one they were both in the military and I do not think there was much of a wedding. if there was we were not invited but found out about it after the fact.

I have already RSVP's that we would not be attending the wedding.  It is taking place in another town about 3 hours away so would pretty much be a whole day committment. 

Just trying to decide whether to give a gift or not.  

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