Humpday Headaches ...

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Humpday Headaches ...
372
Wed, 07-23-2014 - 11:05am

I have a lingering, but not bad, headache today. I got new glasses yesterday and that may be the cause.  I also may have to take them back to be adjusted or even remade, because my left eye isn't focusing right in them.  But, I'll give it another day or so.   Anyone else have a really hard time adjusting to new glasses? I go through this every time. Ugh.

So, fluff for relief ...

Do you know how to ride a horse? When was the last time you did so?

Do you know how to ski? When was the last time you did so?

Did you ever have some weird or odd one-time job? Or do anything odd to earn money for a summer as a kid?

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

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Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 12:23pm

You replied to it, Yes savcal.  But you don't speak for a generation which was a stretch. 

 


 


Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 12:26pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>You replied to it, Yes savcal.  But you don't speak for a generation which was a stretch. </p>

You're right; I don't speak for a generation. But then I didn't attempt to do so.  I simply gave my thoughts, with no impliation that it was universally true or applied to an entire generation.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:02pm

I think you're right, SavCal. A lot more kids have rigorous courses of study. I think college admissions have changed since we left high school. There's a lot more pressure on kids to take AP courses, dual-enroll, and master extra-curicular activities. 

My husband gained admission into several prestigious schools by his college entrance exam scores alone. His grades weren't the best--he only graduated with a 3.0. I doubt that, plus a lack of school activities would have gotten him a full ride to the University of Michigan today like it did then. A lot of those spots are being taken by kids with 4.0+ GPAs with AP/college credit already under their belts, with a wide array of other activities.

Plus, the economy has changed. When I was an older teen, unemployment was low, and places were begging for teens to come work for them. There's not a lot of that happening in the same town today. More adults are competing for entry-level jobs. 

Avatar for savcal2011
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-06-2010
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:09pm

just_another_marla wrote:
<p>I think you're right, SavCal. A lot more kids have rigorous courses of study. I think college admissions have changed since we left high school. There's a lot more pressure on kids to take AP courses, dual-enroll, and master extra-curicular activities. <br /><br />My husband gained admission into several prestigious schools by his college entrance exam scores alone. His grades weren't the best--he only graduated with a 3.0. I doubt that, plus a lack of school activities would have gotten him a full ride to the University of Michigan today like it did then. A lot of those spots are being taken by kids with 4.0+ GPAs with AP/college credit already under their belts, with a wide array of other activities.</p><p><span>Plus, the economy has changed. When I was an older teen, unemployment was low, and places were begging for teens to come work for them. There's not a lot of that happening in the same town today. More adults are competing for entry-level jobs. </span></p>

I think your points are valid, possible factors.  Also, there were no 529 college savings or Coverdell ESA plans prior to 1997.  I think some families had enough money to pay for their child's college, but I don't think "saving" for college was prevalent. Doing so in a tax-defferred or specified educational vehicle most definitely wasn't the norm, if possible at all.  With the advent of those plans, college savings became much easier (and interest-bearing), so I think less kids save for college themselves or have to work during college.

"I don’t mind a banshee, that’s fine. 2 banshees? I HATE you. I actually wish bad things upon you." -- Day[9] Daily #459 P1

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:13pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I'm not of a generation that had to work b/c parents were less well off than families are today, Perhaps you have a link that proves otherwise.  And I don't disagree that there are more demands, academic and otherwise, today but I don't think that negates work.  I just think priorities and work ethic are screwier now, Kids have things without having to work for them among other problems. </p>

I think it can easily negate working, especially in the summers.  This is the first summer that my oldest has been able to have a job, because of the demands of his extraccuriculars, his schedule in the past was simply to unpredictable in the summer.  During the school year, it would have been difficult to hold down a job because of the same thing.  

I wonder though is this more of your preaching here without practicing it in real life?  For example I would assume then that your two oldest have jobs and have had them for a number of years....correct?

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2013
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:14pm

I think your points are valid, possible factors.  Also, there were no 529 college savings or Coverdell ESA plans prior to 1997.  I think some families had enough money to pay for their child's college, but I don't think "saving" for college was prevalent. Doing so in a tax-defferred or specified educational vehicle most definitely wasn't the norm, if possible at all.  With the advent of those plans, college savings became much easier (and interest-bearing), so I think less kids save for college themselves or have to work during college.

You must be speaking for yourself (or should I say your ex) as I know PLENTY of people who have not and can not save for college and the kids are either helping or are paying now or will pay later for college. Sounds like you don't have a wide variety of experience with different types of situations when it comes to paying for college. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:14pm

savcal2011 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;I'm not of a generation that had to work b/c parents were less well off than families are today, Perhaps you have a link that proves otherwise...  And I don't disagree that there are more demands, academic and otherwise, today but I don't think that negates work.  I just think priorities and work ethic are screwier now.  Kids have things without having to work for them among other problems like cycles of  poverty repeating themselves. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I didn't state it as fact. I said I THINK. I can't prove it, or even want to.  My observations of the kids I know now and the kids I knew then lead me to that opinion.</p><p>I have observed a really good work ethic among the kids I know today.  It may not be work at a job - instead it may be work at an activity, or a sport - but it's there. </p><p>Of course, this is why I prefaced my comments with the words/phrases "IME" and "think".  It's my observations, put up for discussion; not put up as fact. </p>

Yes, one can have a work ethic without working at a job, sometimes that is an activity or sport.  I agree, as those sometime are much harder to maintain than a job.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 12-22-2013
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:16pm

My dd is in sports and she can easily work 3 hours a day after that if she would like. She actually applied to the library where she can take the bus from sports to and work 6-9. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:16pm

blackandwhitemolly wrote:
<p><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">I'm not of a generation that had to work b/c parents were less well off than families are today, Perhaps you have a link that proves otherwise...  And I don't disagree that there are more demands, academic and otherwise, today but I don't think that negates work.  I just think priorities and work ethic are screwier now, Kids have things without having to work for them among other problems. </span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size:13px; text-align:left">Yep. My parents weren't well off and they didn't "need" me to work. I know a lot of kids who do sports AND work and it is not because the parents are not well off. It is because there are just so many more things now for kids. My dd is looking for a job and it has nothing to do with how much money we make. She would like to have some extra money and she is looking to work evenings after sports and weekends.</span></strong></p>

I do to, (play sports and work) but it's usually the kids who have to work not need to work...ime.  My older son has a job this summer, but won't continue it once school starts, I don't want my kids working during the school year, way too many other things going on for both of them.  They do volunteer a certain number of hours each semester and in the summer though.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 07-24-2014 - 1:20pm

just_another_marla wrote:
<p>I think you're right, SavCal. A lot more kids have rigorous courses of study. I think college admissions have changed since we left high school. There's a lot more pressure on kids to take AP courses, dual-enroll, and master extra-curicular activities. <br /><br />My husband gained admission into several prestigious schools by his college entrance exam scores alone. His grades weren't the best--he only graduated with a 3.0. I doubt that, plus a lack of school activities would have gotten him a full ride to the University of Michigan today like it did then. A lot of those spots are being taken by kids with 4.0+ GPAs with AP/college credit already under their belts, with a wide array of other activities.</p><p><span>Plus, the economy has changed. When I was an older teen, unemployment was low, and places were begging for teens to come work for them. There's not a lot of that happening in the same town today. More adults are competing for entry-level jobs. </span></p>

I've heard of a few kids this past year having  hard time getting into the college of their choice, despite having good grades and a gpa, the lack of activities has really hurt them.

I don't know how hard it is to get a job in my area, my older son applied for only one job and got that job, but I do see lots of help wanted signs at a variety of places for teens to work.

PumpkinAngel

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