The IDGAF What You're Wearing Saturday Thread

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Registered: 05-31-2011
The IDGAF What You're Wearing Saturday Thread
91
Sat, 04-13-2013 - 9:50pm

1. What are you currently reading?

2. How often do you find time to read?

3. Are you bi/tri-lingual?

4. Have you ever been arrested?

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Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
I thought your kids went through Summer immersion programs bord, No german?

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

emptynester2009 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">springfever2013</em> wrote:</div>No point, just responding to other posts. Usually when someone says they work long hours all the time, you would think it would be all the time as they said. lol Arent we done with this yet? Bawahhhaaa...go check out Vince vaughn.....very funny :)</blockquote></p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium">No, actually most people would think that a general statement is just that a general statement and not meant to be taken literally.   Working long all the time does not mean working long hours each and every day, just that over time their work hours may be more than average.</span></p><p><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium">But the way you keep harping on it makes it seem like you think there is something wrong with working hours.   Is there something wrong with working long hours in general</span><span style="font-family:comic sans ms,sans-serif; font-size:medium">  or is there only something wrong with certain people working long hours?  <br /></span></p>

My bet is her husband's working long hours is about as fascinating as the news about springfever's husband.  Neither relates to debate but they both keep coming up..  kind of naturally. 

 

 

Avatar for BeaArthurisMyReligion
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

as with any language Jams, if you don't use it you can lose it, and with my parents gone and really no occassion to be  "with deaf" as my grandfather used to say I don't use it as much as i used to.. but I was surprised how much came back to me when my mom died five years ago and about 80% of the people at th funeral were deaf I was happy I was able to do so well. my brother is MUCH better than I as he has a deaf paralegal so he has had a reason to keep up with it.    Being around deaf culture and deaf speak makes me homesick.. through the fun of Facebook I have reconnected with dozens and dozens of deaf friends I grew up with when they were in school and I was living on campus.. they were really my only companions so I spent all afternoon with them.. it's been so fun to find them on FB and share memories again... I miss deaf culture in my daily world...!

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Awww, That is neat bea. There was an interpreter at your mom's funeral then? I learned a lot in that class I took and there really is a "culture" I never understood before. We watched several vieos that were pulled from Gallaudet University and the students there.

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Jam, they did go through formal summer immersion programs. One in French for two years, the other in Italian for a year. They've also lived in France and Italy a couple of times for several months at a time. But they are not truly bilingual. And no, neither of them chose to study German. They've only done minimal visiting in Getman-speaking areas.
Avatar for BeaArthurisMyReligion
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

Hi Jams, yes an interpreter at my mom's funeral, at my dad's funeral, at my sister's funeral and at my grandfather's funeral.. and at my first wedding LOL!   Lots of deaf inour world.   My parents met at Gallaudet actually and wrote their graduate thesis together on the history of Catholic education of the deaf, my dad taught there for a while and that's where my brother was born, then he was dean of the California school for the deaf and that's where my sister was born then he became superintendent of the school in maine where I was born and my mom said "no more moving!!"  ;-)  my mom taught high school English and Reading and did so until about the mid 90s.. she was a force of nature.   Deaf culture is so strong inour family with both my parents having been raised by deaf parents (and I had many deaf great uants/ uncles etc..) my mom used to tell people she was 'more deaf than hearing' mostly b/cof the culture she identified with.  When I read 'deaf speak' i get so nostaligc.. one of the boys I grew up with who of course is now my age... wrote on my FB page one day 'I love see you happy so much with your lovely happy love partner"  LOL... made me a little teary :-)

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Well, true bilingualism involves the ability to speak two languages with the fluency of a native speaker. None of us has achieved that, not even my husband, who is able to teach college courses in French at a French university. I go to conferences where the papers are delivered in French, and I am able to follow the presentations, but it is hard work for me. If my attention drifts, I can easily lose the thread of the argument. I can carry out daily conversations but I sometimes make grammatical mistakes such as getting my sequence of tenses wrong, and I sometimes have to have an idiom explained to me.
Avatar for BeaArthurisMyReligion
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

I think one reason my signing is so good is that I  learned it by immersion in my family not in a course (although not to denigrate that, i know excellent signers who learned in classrooms) but I learned to sign the way the deaf sign (especialy my grandfather who was the hardest to follow b/c of his tendency to abbreviate word) .. and it's not logical at ALL which is why I think i got it... instead of signing "have you been to the store today?"  the deaf will often sign somthing which translates to "finish touch store you ?"  THAT I get... it's just crazy left brained enough for me.. (or is it right brained.. i forget LOL)

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Jams, when people talk about language acquisition, "bilingual" is usually reserved for people who speak two languages as native languages, and who learned both languages from before they were school age. Although I am fluent in 2 languages, I am not considered a true bilingual by linguists, since the second language (English) was acquired at school beginning at age 11 (too little and too late to make me a true bilingual). My daughter is a true bilingual, since she has been speaking both her languages from toddlerhood on. It does make a difference in how you use the languages and in how you translate between the languages.
Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

I think the ability to pick it up easily is a gift. SIL was born in Italy and that language still comes naturally to her even though she's lived here most of her life. I don't know if my other brother's wife was born in Mexico but she has lots of family on both sides of the border and it's a natural second language for her too. Her nanny speaks no english and I find it amazing the ability her small children have in going back and forth b/w spanish and english, That's the ability my DS' buddy has with sign language too as his mother is deaf.

DD1 is in her 3rd year of french but there are only parts of it she retains.

 


 


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