The IDGAF What You're Wearing Saturday Thread

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-31-2011
The IDGAF What You're Wearing Saturday Thread
91
Sat, 04-13-2013 - 9:50pm

1. What are you currently reading?

2. How often do you find time to read?

3. Are you bi/tri-lingual?

4. Have you ever been arrested?

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iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001

BeaArthurisMyReligion wrote:
<p style="text-align:left">Deafspeak makes me homesick....</p>

I may continue onto ASL II but it wll never come naturally like you.  There are tons of websites the professor gave us to visit but this guy was probably who I tapped in with the most when I needed to:

http://www.lifeprint.com/

 

 

 


 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
"we had to observe babies and toddlers and record/analyze their babbling. We saw lots of films of deaf baby babbling because of the profs specialty." -------- I find that fascinating, and it does, of course, back Chomsky's hypothesis, the spirit of it at least.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
That was part of our class, Rollmops, we had to observe babies and toddlers and record/analyze their babbling. We saw lots of films of deaf baby babbling because of the profs specialty. I'm glad I bought that degree. Worth every penny.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
My great-grandmother came to the USA as a girl from a textile mill town in Scotland and went to work in the textile mills of western Massachusetts. The mill floors were horrendously noisy and being hearing has no advantage, so they were quite willing to hire deaf workers. My grandfather, who was born in 1900, grew up around kids with deaf parents; to hear him tell it, half the population of North Adams, Massachusetts was deaf in the first decades of the 20th century. His grandparents on the paternal side had come over from Germany in the 19th century, too. There was a large community of Getmans in the mills whose English was only so-so. Somehow the deaf, the native hearing English speakers, and the immigrants all managed to communicate and turn out cloth.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Bord, that descriptive nickname habit is preserved in many Greek last names. There are last names like "Deaf," "Six-fingered," "Dark-browed" etc. Deaf children who are raised in deaf families babble just like hearing kids, only they babble in ASL.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Bea, you just explained perfectly what it means to be bilingual as opposed to acquiring the second language in a class.
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
"Her nanny speaks no english and I find it amazing the ability her small children have in going back and forth b/w spanish and english, That's the ability my DS' buddy has with sign language too as his mother is deaf." --------- Those kids will be true bilinguals if both languages are continued and kept up as they grow. It can be a tremendous advantage in many ways and beyond just the practical aspect of being able to talk to more people easily. Your SIL is doing her kids a great favor.
Avatar for BeaArthurisMyReligion
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Registered: 02-20-2013

Deafspeak makes me homesick....

Avatar for BeaArthurisMyReligion
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013

my mother actually didn't really talk  for a few years.. she just signed... she was never talkative as an adult.. neither of her parents had much speech.. my dad's mom on the othe hand had been educated in a oral school setting so she talked more than signed but his dad primarily signed... the fact that my dad's mom was born in italiy and his father was born in ireland added a whole other layer of complication to the language spoken at home LOL

iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Ahhh, ASL all over again.. Yes bea! :) Syntax is very different. My deaf friend just wrote something to me in my last facebook post, The order of her words are different but the meaning is the same.

 


 


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