Interestng article

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Interestng article
73
Sun, 05-23-2010 - 10:18am

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iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2010
Fri, 05-28-2010 - 9:44am
Yes I think that explains most of the "horror" that the researchers had--being judgmental of families and their workings when most of the researchers were not married and did not have children.

“Clearly," said Arthur,"you're an idiot- but you're our kind of idiot. Come on.” 
― Markus ZusakThe Book Thief

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 1:40pm

That's true. An empty next is a lot less stressful than a household full of kids.

For the most part my DH and I are complete control of our time outside of work. We do not have a lot of "have tos".

Avatar for mommy2amani
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-26-2003
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 1:35pm


I just wanted to comment that not everyone finds a busy lifestyle to be stressful.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 1:33pm
I wonder how much stress is caused by money worries and debt, too, that hopefully people in their fifties have eliminated. I imagine being right out of college, probably with some debt, finding a suitable job, trying to negotiate house and car purchases, trying to figure out if you can afford to have children and when, and all those things are more stressful than being fifty and having all that behind you.
iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 1:28pm

Recently many of the news outlets were reporting on a study that found a lot stress to be age related. Those in their 20's were at lot more stressed out than the over 50 crowd.

They speculate that it is because of experience. Those in their 50s have a lot more "been there, done it" time under their belts.

I am finding it to be true and think that they are right on their speculation as to why.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 1:11pm
If you were exhibiting objetive signs of stress and spitting out high levels of cortisol, they might have some reason to describe your life as stressful. Otherwise, not so much. On the other hand, you wouldn't qualify for the study, because they were studying families with two full time working parents. You work part-time, right?
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 1:10pm
I don't think they were simply judged stressful, they measured each family members cortisol levels as well. If one loves a chaotic life then you'd expect their cortisol levels to be low in times of chaos, and it'd be hard for researchers to then judge that person as stressed.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



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Ten Rules for Being Human


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"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 12:54pm

I think the problem comes with anyone saying "Life is....." There's going to be someone who disagrees with it, because for someone, their life might not be that.


 

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 12:30pm
I would be in complete agreement if I (or someone else) had said that "life is stressful", b/c THAT statement is subjective. Perhaps it's just semantics, but I don't think that making the statement that "life is full of stressors" has the same meaning, or that it's subjective in the same way.



It's probably semantics. The original statements seems to have been "Life is full of stresses." That could be interpreted as life is full of events that have the potential to cause stress, or life is full of experiences that are perceived as stressful. If you said life is stressful, that's clearly clearly is only true for those who perceive life as that. If you said life can be stressful, we'll that's pretty true across the board, it has that potential. If you said life is full of stressors, well again that depends on whether a persons life is full of things that stress them out. It's really going to be individual unless you generalize it with qualifier like it has that potential or can be stressful.

Say not, 'I have found the truth,' but rather, 'I have found a truth.' -Kahlil Gibran



PhotobucketPhotobucket
PhotobucketPhotobucket



Ten Rules for Being Human


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"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2005
Thu, 05-27-2010 - 12:26pm

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This makes me think of a comedy sketch where the comedian talked about how he and a friend of his (who was high on weed at the time), encountered a bear in the woods. He took off running, but then realized his friend wasn't with him. When he looked back, his friend was raising his hand and pledging to prevent forest fires. The bear went away and the friend said "Man, Smokey is much more intense in person."
Same situation, two different perceptions.












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