Job Satisfaction

iVillage Member
Registered: 08-22-2009
Job Satisfaction
74
Thu, 01-14-2010 - 10:21am

I have seen reports in various news sources talking about a study that states that job satisfaction is a low. The reporters all seem to be surprised at the study. Their thinking is that in a bad economy those that have jobs should be grateful for job satisfaction should be up.

I totally agree with the reasoning that job satisfaction would be down in a bad economy for a few reasons:

1. In a good economy those that are not satisfied with their jobs have more options to change jobs than in a bad economy.

2. Employers know that and can put on more work load etc since it is very unlikely for that employer to leave.

3. Sometime when companies are hurting they will purposely make things harder on employees. It is much better for their bottom line to have someone leave on their own (or with cause) that to have to pay a severance package for layoff.

Your thoughts.

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iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 6:58pm

i don't think being unhappy about a job, the economy is like being unhappy when a child/a parent/a spouse/etc is diagnosed with cancer.

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2009
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 7:51pm
that was confusing but I think I disagree.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2009
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 8:18pm
when i was married to ex, I found lots of reasons to be out and away from the house and leave ex with the kids. My best friend and I would go scrapbooking almost weekly as well as go to two or three weekend events per year. we'd find time to go to women's conventions OR to take adult ed classes.
iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2009
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 8:27pm

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I stuck it out in a long, miserable marriage (along with a job that I loved and having fun raising my kids) but I don't consider myself the "middle of the spectrum".

iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2009
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 8:35pm

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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2009
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 8:52pm

Let me see if I can put this into a bit of perspective for you since I am the parent of a child with a degenerative neurological brain disorder. She is 16 and was not really expected to bypass 5-10 years.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Wed, 01-20-2010 - 9:39pm

Hmmmm, well you wouldn't have to be smack in the middle. You could be somewhere on the happy end, maybe closer to the middle or maybe you were stuck in a long lag. Did you stay because you were in a situation that you were better off staying or felt you couldn't leave (your ability to find the bright side helped you endure the bad stuff) or was having a happy relationship just not that important to you? Although if you were able to be a happy person in a miserable relationship then you probably aren't that near the middle, so I'm guessing you were somehow stuck in that relationship?

I didn't leave my first marriage as soon as there were problems, there wasn't a day it went from good to miserable, it was very gradual. There was a day when I realized I could never be happy in that relationship, and that was a definite turning point. If I couldn't change the relationship in order to be happy at some future point, I had to change that I was in the relationship at all. I was married nine years, I'd say six were okay, three were a slow slide toward divorce. I think there was maybe 6 months between realizing I'd never be happy in it, and saying that I wanted out.

"The last of human freedoms - the ability to choose one's attitude in a given set of circumstances." - Viktor Frankl.



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iVillage Member
Registered: 04-22-2009
Thu, 01-21-2010 - 5:46am

I'm definitely way on the happy end.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-24-2008
Thu, 01-21-2010 - 6:38am
Blah is a good word, some of my downward slide years could be described as blah. When I wrote the example before of people who stay a long time in a miserable marriage what I had in mind was someone who would decide their done and rather than wait 6 weeks after knowing they are just done like you did, or take 6 months to figure it all out like I did (I also had only a few weeks between I'm absolutely leaving and actually telling him, mostly because I was chicken to say it), they look at the calendar and go "let's see, I'm definitely done, I don't want to be married to him/her anymore, the youngest child goes off to college in 8 years, that looks like a good time to leave." That person might be more in the middle of the spectrum, not way happy, but not necesarily a misery-seeker, just able to tolerate a lot of being miserable without a strong inner drive for happiness. I think my current dh is more middle of the road, kind of a balance of optimism and pessimism, not way out in ever-optimistic land where I am. His ex can't be happy no matter what, she can't even enjoy a vacation, one child achieving something big is an excuse to denigrate another child for not measuring up, she's way on the other end ensuring everything is just plain miserable. But that's who she is, it's her comfort zone. She's as unable to do it my way as I am to do it her way.

"The last of human freedoms - the ability to choose one's attitude in a given set of circumstances." - Viktor Frankl.



Photobucket



Ten Rules for Being Human
"The key to good decision making is not knowledge. It is understanding."
Malcolm Gladwell Blink

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-15-2006
Thu, 01-21-2010 - 8:32am
i had never heard of him, that quote until i saw it in your sig.

 

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