Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 6:58pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
  No garnetboy, I don't come out and tell my kids you can't have it all word for word but I won't paint some rosy, perfect world without sacrifices/give and take either.  You've not acknowledged what I'm very aware exists in the real world, If you don't want to hear that just say it.

Really well said, Jam.  (AND even *I* understood every word.Wink)  I can't imagine lying to my children now about a rosy future only to have them face all too honest, insurmountable difficulties in the future.  What good is that?  It would be to their detriment.  It is avoidable pain.

It's easy to lie to a child about an impossible "life plan."  I wouldn't though.  If it included things like an expensive private college and a PhD when same could not be paid for, then it's time for the parent to gently concede everyone can't have it all.  Not everyone can be a MLB player or astronaut.  Mom and Dad won't co-sign the loan for the charitable no-kill cat shelter.  Etc.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 6:59pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>  I'm not quite sure what you are asking.  We are prepared to pay for our children's undergraduate college wherever they decide to go.  We are not prepared to pay for graduate school, because it's my belief that if you can't get a tuition waiver and an assistantship for a PhD program, you shouldn't be in it. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I was curious about your definition of having it all, since you mention applauding kids' ambitions, in the middle of a discussion about "having it all."  </p><p>I think it's hollow to tell a child he or she can have it all, and at the same time not set aside the tuition, R&amp;B for a postbaccalaureate degree or 2 even in the humanities or when teaching others would be too much of a distraction. You disagree.  And you will tell your children they can have it all?  </p>

Yes, because clearly if you can't afford multiple degrees for your kids, you are a horrible parent. So you're going to fall back on your usual pattern of condescension and economic superiority instead of actually debating the issue at hand? Classic. But I'm going to agree with the academic, who actually has a Ph.D and experience in the field, and her assertation that if you're a candidate who can't get a tuition waiver and assistantship, you shouldn't be in the program. And if you can only handle the program and nothing else, again, I'm going hazard a guess that you shouldn't be in the program. My professor this semester is teaching three graduate level courses, leading an extracurricular course and finishing his book. All while applying for a tenure-track position at the uni (he's currently "visiting") and all of the interviews, presentations, etc involved with that. IOW, he's got a lot going on. In addition to his young family. If he couldn't juggle an assistantship with his studies, he couldn't manage the balancing act he's got going on now. And I know he did that b/c I've seen his CV...

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:01pm

bordwithyou wrote:
.</p><p>I have always encouraged my children in their pursuit of happiness, and never wanted them to limit their dreams by accepting someone else's definition of what that happiness ought to entail.    </p>

EXACTLY!

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:02pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>  No garnetboy, I don't come out and tell my kids you can't have it all word for word but I won't paint some rosy, perfect world without sacrifices/give and take either.  Y<span style="text-decoration:underline"><strong>ou've not acknowledged what I'm very aware exists in the real world, If you don't want to hear that just say it.</strong></span> </blockquote></p><p>Really well said, Jam.  (AND even *I* understood every word.<img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-wink.gif" alt="Wink" title="Wink" border="0" />)  I can't imagine lying to my children now about a rosy future only to have them face all too honest, insurmountable difficulties in the future.  What good is that?  It would be to their detriment.  It is avoidable pain.</p><p>It's easy to lie to a child about an impossible "life plan."  I wouldn't though.  If it included things like an expensive private college and a PhD when same could not be paid for, then it's time for the parent to gently concede everyone can't have it all.  Not everyone can be a MLB player or astronaut.  Mom and Dad won't co-sign the loan for the charitable no-kill cat shelter.  Etc.</p>

Did you think that telling your kids that they can achieve their dreams means handing them those things on a silver platter?  How odd.  My job as a parent entails helping them define their dreams, pointing them in the right direction, and giving them the best start in life we can so that they have the tools to achieve their dreams.

Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:06pm

Yea, feminists plow the way so you can have a job. That's nice. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:13pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>  No garnetboy, I don't come out and tell my kids you can't have it all word for word but I won't paint some rosy, perfect world without sacrifices/give and take either.  Y<span style="text-decoration:underline"><strong>ou've not acknowledged what I'm very aware exists in the real world, If you don't want to hear that just say it.</strong></span> </blockquote></p><p>Really well said, Jam.  (AND even *I* understood every word.<img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-wink.gif" alt="Wink" title="Wink" border="0" />)  I can't imagine lying to my children now about a rosy future only to have them face all too honest, insurmountable difficulties in the future.  What good is that?  It would be to their detriment.  It is avoidable pain.</p><p>It's easy to lie to a child about an impossible "life plan."  I wouldn't though.  If it included things like an expensive private college and a PhD when same could not be paid for, then it's time for the parent to gently concede everyone can't have it all.  Not everyone can be a MLB player or astronaut.  Mom and Dad won't co-sign the loan for the charitable no-kill cat shelter.  Etc.</p>

How do you know that someone on here can't afford expensive private college and a Ph.D? I attended an expensive private college courtesy of scholarships. It was actually cheaper for me to attend the "expensive private college" than it would have been for me to attend a state school. The private school had a strong endowment and smaller pool of applicants. Which meant more $$$ for financial aid for me. One of my sorority sisters was awarded a merit scholarship on the basis of her grades. She didn't need the financial aid, so her dad gave her the cash he saved on her tuition.

Right now DD wants to be a vet. Whether she actually goes through with it or not, IDK. She's five. But if that's she still wants to do in 12 years, DH and I will support her. I just don't get the idea of telling your kid they can't do something b/c you don't think it is reasonable. Do you think Virginia Clinton thought her son was going to grow up to be the President? Look at Clinton's upbringing--that was a long shot, to say the least. But he did it. I am not going to kick my kid or deflate their dreams. And if the world does it, I will be here for them to pick up the pieces.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:16pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Uhm, This thread has produced a division b/w women who think we can have it all and those who don't believe there is such a thing, It's the NOW jrs and Gloria Steinham would be proud. </p>

True.  And I think there's a lot of posturing going on. 

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:16pm
Well it's a good thing the my husband and I have saved for the private college if my kids choose that route. They may not, but if they do choose, we can underwrite for it. My daughter has no designs on being as astronaut yet, but her new field of study is quantum physics. At 18, I have no doubt that if she may have the opportunity to travel into the cosmos, but what the heck, my favorite cartoon when I was a kids was the jetsons My musically inclined son has dreams of being a rock star, but as he matures his practical backup plan is a degree in music and music and math education. I think he could be a wonderful teacher who jams on the side in a band for fun and profit. Your way sounds like a new caste system - the college dream is for the rich, not for the likes of you.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:17pm

quote=jamblessedthree]<p>Uhm, This thread has produced a division b/w women who think we can have it all and those who don't believe there is such a thing, It's the NOW jrs and Gloria Steinham would be proud. </p>[/quote]

<p>I am thankful for all the feminists who came before to offer me the choices that they never had. I am really old, and I was in the second class that accepted women at my undergrad university. I was offered an athletic scholarship before title 9 thanks to the work of those feminists. I am grateful to all the women who fought so hard for equality that I was of a generation that had access to a first rate college education in a "man's" field.</p>

Does anyone ever ask men if the "have it all"? Gender politics, perpetuated by false assumptions that perfect balance is achievable through feminism.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:17pm

thardy2001 wrote:
Do you agree with Puss bouquet that she has it all?</p>

Why would she (or anyone else) *need* to agree with me that I have it all? 

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

Pages