Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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Community Leader
Registered: 01-03-2004
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 5:40am

Another causality of Obamacare. Read the fine print. Businesses are saying ANYTHING other than this is the reason to avoid a firestorm of public criticism for not "supporting" the law, but this is the real reason WAH has been cancelled at Yahoo. They have to offer you health care: they want you in the office. Get ready for more decisions like this.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 6:15am
WisdomTooth, How exactly are you privy to this information?
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 6:21am
That's quite the conspiracy theory. What in the world does heath care benefits have to do with where one works? Who are "they" who have to offer you health care? employers? Why would "they" want you in the office?
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-12-2005
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 7:26am
I know I am late to the topic, but am going to add my two cents. I work from home two days a week. My employer requires child care for the hours worked, and my schedule is the same at home as it is in the office. If I go to a doctor's appointment or volunteer at the school, I use credit time or leave. The advantages are that I can continue to work while sick, use slightly less leave for those appointments, since I am closer to the location, sleep in since I do not have to dress for work, and have lunch with my two youngest and their nanny. I also use my morning break to throw in a load of laundry, move it at lunchtime, fold it on afternoon break. All of these little benefits add up to improved work/life balance for my family. There can be more distractions at home, but I have found ways to cope. My management team came to my office a year after I started working from home, and said they felt my productivity "exploded" since I started doing it. We actually have a monthly assessment if our productivity, and mine increased significantly, plus my feedback on the quality of the work also showed that there was no sacrifice of that aspect. My managers and I credit the work-from-home arrangement. With all that said, my job is not one that requires face-to-face time or creativity. In Yahoo's case, I can grudgingly say that it may have been a necessity. But I do hope that it does not cause a wave of other employers following suit.
iVillage Member
Registered: 07-12-2005
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 7:34am
So now that I addressed the main topic, some of the side debates: What is with the idea that our children are only capable of what we give them? Way to believe in our kids. I agree that if I am telling my kids they HAVE to go to college, then I need to provide at least the EFC for them. But if my kid has a dream that I can't fund, I am still going to believe in them. If the dream is not realistic for them, I would steer them towards a goal that is equal in degree, but more realistic in nature. I.e, if my child said he wanted to get a Ph.D. in English Lit, but I know his aptitude, and grades, are better in math, I may encourage him to pursue it in math instead. But I cannot imagine ever telling my kids they cannot reach all of their goals, and have to choose between career goals and family. Especially in a world where they see others doing it. What a terrible message, "sure, honey, Susie's dad can be a good parent and upper level executive, but you are not as good as Susie's dad. You have a vagina."
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 10:41am
"The cheapest option, without financial aid, is about 25K a year. It must be nice to find a spare 100K in the couch cushions or something, because I had to plan for that possible expense." --- Apparently grandma will be paying, which is nice. My grandpa gave me a college fund and it was much appreciated, since my parents had no intention of helping. My mother has, however, started giving me about 7K a year now that dd is in college, in case I need it for dd's expenses. Since I don't, I am putting it away for retirement. That too is much appreciated.
iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2013
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 2:33pm
"The cheapest option, without financial aid, is about 25K a year. It must be nice to find a spare 100K in the couch cushions or something, because I had to plan for that possible expense." --- Apparently grandma will be paying, which is nice. My grandpa gave me a college fund and it was much appreciated, since my parents had no intention of helping. My mother has, however, started giving me about 7K a year now that dd is in college, in case I need it for dd's expenses. Since I don't, I am putting it away for retirement. That too is much appreciated. --------------That is wonderful for family to be generous. Many are very generous and I thought in the past you thought there was something wrong with that? (Christmas gifts?)
Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 3:30pm
Hazel, lol, no not exactly. My grandpa and now my mom (with the same money that grandpa used) were/are paying forward for the betterment of the clan. Also, if I had dire CC debt or some such, some of the money so generously forwarded to me would be spent on reducing that debt.
iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 4:46pm

<Apparently grandma will be paying, which is nice. My grandpa gave me a college fund and it was much appreciated, since my parents had no intention of helping. My mother has, however, started giving me about 7K a year now that dd is in college, in case I need it for dd's expenses. Since I don't, I am putting it away for retirement.>

I'm grateful that my parents helped with my college education so I don't have to rely on their generosity for my own children. My father is a generous man, but as a retired teacher living on a pension and social security, he doesn't have 100K to give to each of his grandkids. I am just thankful that he is healthy and independent at 88. Many of my friends are dealing with elderly and ill parents whose medical issues have burned through their retirement savings.

The gift from your mom is a nice one, but IIRC, Hazel would take issue with socking it away for your retirement. You're supposed to spend immediately and entirely on your kid, otherwise you're stealing or something.

iVillage Member
Registered: 03-01-2013
Sat, 03-02-2013 - 4:49pm
That is great Rollmops and that would be your choice but I personally would not want to pay my children's cc bills. I would be willing to help out with other things (so they could pay their bills). Would you use that same money if your mom left it to you to help your child and her dh with cc bills that they have made?

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