Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 9:55am
What are you saying, Jams, that a woman who doesn't have a "real job" is incapable of being a role model for younger women?
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 10:26am

bordwithyou wrote:
What are you saying, Jams, that a woman who doesn't have a "real job" is incapable of being a role model for younger women?

Do I think women without real jobs are incapable of being role models for young women?  Absolutely not.  But when you're a walking hypocrite like Hilary Rosen you should be prepared to get called on it, Lol. 

 


 


Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 10:32am
OK, jams, but last I checked Hilary Rosen wasn't posting here, and Bord is not Hilary Rosen posing as a college professor.
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:19pm

bordwithyou wrote:
<p>You know, when my younger kid was about ten, he wrote out his "life plan."  He was going to be a professional baseball player from 18-25, then retire from that and be an astronaut from 25-40, then retire from that and go live in the country and open a no-kill cat shelter for sick and unwanted pets.   I guess I should have told him he was being unrealistic, hunh?  Instead, we applauded his ambitions.   We knew he probably wasn't going to pro ball, or go into space.  We let him sign up for Little League and sent him to Space Camp and got him a cat, anyway.</p>

Exactly and while my boys dreams have not been exactly the same, we haven't limited his dreams by telling him that he can't/won't make them come true because....who knows?

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:20pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">pumpkinangel</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;span&gt;&amp;lt;&amp;lt;In this one instance, I agree with Thardy, but probably for different reasons. Feminism has been misrepresented by the "having it all" formulation. It sets an impossible bar for female success and then ensures that when women fail to clear it, it’s feminism – as opposed to persistent gender inequity – that’s to blame. Feminism gave my generation more choices, and there can be upside and downsides to all choices, but at least we can make choices that were unavailable to prior generations of women.&amp;gt;&amp;gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px"&gt;I wasn't thinking of the glass ceiling in only the traditional feminism way only.  I was thinking of it more in a way of how Jam and hardy are limiting the options of their children (both boys and girls) by already telling them at a young age, they can't have it all.  Perhaps not the right comparasion but it came to mind with the limits that those posters are describing to their children.&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;span style="font-size:13px"&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>

Do you agree with Puss bouquet that she has it all?</p>

Of course, why or how could I disagree with what someone thinks of their life?  

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:23pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Uhm, This thread has produced a division b/w women who think we can have it all and those who don't believe there is such a thing, It's the NOW jrs and Gloria Steinham would be proud. </p>

Has a woman who thinks she does have it all, I have to question why any woman would be satisified with a life that doesn't live up to their expectations if they had the opportunity to change it?  

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:24pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>No garnetboy, I don't come out and tell my kids you can't have it all word for word but I won't paint some rosy, perfect world without sacrifices/give and take either.  You've not acknowledged what I'm very aware exists in the real world, If you don't want to hear that just say it. </p>

You might have missed the rather large point that not a single person said that their having it all was without sacrifices, give/take or darn hard work.  

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:28pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>  I'm not quite sure what you are asking.  We are prepared to pay for our children's undergraduate college wherever they decide to go.  We are not prepared to pay for graduate school, because it's my belief that if you can't get a tuition waiver and an assistantship for a PhD program, you shouldn't be in it. &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>I was curious about your definition of having it all, since you mention applauding kids' ambitions, in the middle of a discussion about "having it all."  </p><p>I think it's hollow to tell a child he or she can have it all, and at the same time not set aside the tuition, R&amp;B for a postbaccalaureate degree or 2 even in the humanities or when teaching others would be too much of a distraction. You disagree.  And you will tell your children they can have it all?  </p>

I'm curious hardy, why do you think having it all means having it all given to someone?  Why does telling a kid they can have it all in their life equal the parents paying for it all to you? 

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:30pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>  No garnetboy, I don't come out and tell my kids you can't have it all word for word but I won't paint some rosy, perfect world without sacrifices/give and take either.  Y<span style="text-decoration:underline"><strong>ou've not acknowledged what I'm very aware exists in the real world, If you don't want to hear that just say it.</strong></span> </blockquote></p><p>Really well said, Jam.  (AND even *I* understood every word.<img src="/forums/sites/all/libraries/tinymce/jscripts/tiny_mce/plugins/emotions/img/smiley-wink.gif" alt="Wink" title="Wink" border="0" />)  I can't imagine lying to my children now about a rosy future only to have them face all too honest, insurmountable difficulties in the future.  What good is that?  It would be to their detriment.  It is avoidable pain.</p><p>It's easy to lie to a child about an impossible "life plan."  I wouldn't though.  If it included things like an expensive private college and a PhD when same could not be paid for, then it's time for the parent to gently concede everyone can't have it all.  Not everyone can be a MLB player or astronaut.  Mom and Dad won't co-sign the loan for the charitable no-kill cat shelter.  Etc.</p>

OH I get it, it's about money to you and not a child working to obtain their own goals, a parent must pay for the goal.  Question is why do you think that?  

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:32pm

<<Did you think that telling your kids that they can achieve their dreams means handing them those things on a silver platter?  How odd.  My job as a parent entails helping them define their dreams, pointing them in the right direction, and giving them the best start in life we can so that they have the tools to achieve their dreams.>>

Exactly and I think hardy (along with Jam earlier) missed the point where it was stated that work (and hard work at times) can be involved in obtaining that dream.  

PumpkinAngel

Pages