Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

Pages

Avatar for rollmops2009
iVillage Member
Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 1:28pm
"Or perhaps I should tell my children not to make any retirement plans, since their father and I do not intend on funding their retirement. Oh dear, how will they EVER manage to retire?" Obviously you should make clear to them that they should not expect to be able to retire, since you are not planning on making it happen for them. Come to think of it, since you do not live in a community that has arranged marriages, you should probably also make sure to lower their expectations of having wives and families of their own. I am sure there are more items that need to go on this list.
iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 1:15pm
Yes, I was unaware that not paying for a child to complete a graduate degree is the same thing as telling that child to drop out of a PhD program, or that we were parenting that the only way to "have it all" is if your parents pay for it. Are we also prending that "not being able to have it all" means "no one is going to pay to fulfill your every wish from cradle to grave?" Or perhaps I should tell my children not to make any retirement plans, since their father and I do not intend on funding their retirement. Oh dear, how will they EVER manage to retire?
iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:56pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p>For PKA for tomorrow as I don't want her to miss it:</p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">pumpkinangel</em> wrote:</div>  I wasn't thinking of the glass ceiling in only the traditional feminism way only.  I was thinking of it more in a way of how Jam and hardy are limiting the options of their children (both boys and girls) by already telling them at a young age, they can't have it all.  Perhaps not the right comparasion but it came to mind with the limits that those posters are describing to their children. </blockquote></p><p><em>Do you agree with Puss bouquet that she has it all?</em></p>

Yep, I was spending time with one of my children last night supporting a dream in the making.  I believe in that you know.  :)

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:53pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>What are you saying, Jams, that a woman who doesn't have a "real job" is incapable of being a role model for younger women?</blockquote></p><p>Do I think women without real jobs are incapable of being role models for young women?  Absolutely not.  But when you're a walking hypocrite like Hilary Rosen you should be prepared to get called on it, Lol. </p>

Who exactly are you calling a walking hypocrite, Jam?

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:53pm

rollmops2009 wrote:
Dd was going to become a vet, then get a boat with a vet office onboard, and then she would go from island to island taking care of all the sick and mistreated animals. I discussed with her completely seriously how she would go about organizing fundraisers for such a project. Why not? It was a good idea.

This has always been my experience as a parent.  Kid has dream, parents and kid talk about dream and how to make it a reality.  

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:51pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Like you my friend says that too, She gives speeches to her girls, she attends a thousand dollar a plate dinners, etc. You get it and I call that politics, Sort of like the Hilary Rosens that tell women what they want to hear too......  But does she have a real job?  I am influenced by people that practice what they preach and my hope is that my children will be too.   </p><p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">reginageorge2005</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;jamblessedthree&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;&amp;lt;p&amp;gt;That's pretty much what my friend says about her sorotiy too.&amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;As an advisor, I always tell my women, "If you leave a better woman than when you started, we've done our job." Most of them do.&lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p>

I don't understand how encouraging other women and wanting to empower young women while working in retail makes her a hypocrite. But silly me, I'd also call retail a "real job."

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:47pm

thardy2001 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>Well, Thardy, it looks like I didn't have enough time home with my children to satisfy YOU. But I had enough to satisfy ME. And since I am living my life, and you are living yours, that's just fine and dandy.</blockquote></p><p>It's not about you, it's what's best in SAH for the kids.  Rushing back to work, it's not enough time for the baby.  Stay at-home too long and one loses traction in her career.  No one can have it all.  Not men, not women.</p>

I don't agree. based on that very limited scope of "having it all", I did quite nicely balancing the two.  I am not unique in that balance, but it does take work.

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:40pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>See, Having it all equals perfection, And I agree.  But why raise a child to believe life is perfect? </p>

Who said perfection?

PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:37pm

<<And how can you claim to have had it all when you had to return to work after you had your babies?  And if you're going with...you had more than enough time at-home when they were children, I'd disagree.  I've SAH more years, and I still want to SAH more with my children.  And if one SAH, she necessarily loses traction in her career.  Again, no one can have it all.>>

Well for me, I chose to go back to work when I did, each time.  I've had lots of time home with my children and still have time home with my children and I haven't lost traction in my career, I'm right where I want to be at this moment.  I've been very luck and with a lot of hard work, I think I have it all.  It's not impossible but you can't wait around for mummy and daddy to pay for it, you have to go out and work for it.  Of course, not everyone is willing to work for their dreams.

But really....work and kids are the only way you define having it all?  That seems rather limited, imo.


PumpkinAngel

iVillage Member
Registered: 06-27-1998
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 12:33pm

<<I asked about men "having it all" a few pages ago. Lauren addressed it. T & Jam conveniently ignored it. I'm always very curious about that...>>

I find that curious as well....

PumpkinAngel

Pages