Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

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Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 4:10pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
Exactly, The failure is in the population that refuses to acknowledge sacrifice, compromise and give and take to reach a common goal, It's the I want it all and now mentality that I will never undersgtand, And the justifying that it's ok to raise our children (if mostly girls in the context of this thread) this way is incredible! What a selfish idealogy.

If you think that anyone on this thread is advocating an "I want it all, and I want it all now" mentality, then you are seriously misinterpreting the thread.

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Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 4:03pm
Exactly, The failure is in the population that refuses to acknowledge sacrifice, compromise and give and take to reach a common goal, It's the I want it all and now mentality that I will never undersgtand, And the justifying that it's ok to raise our children (if mostly girls in the context of this thread) this way is incredible! What a selfish idealogy.

 

 

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Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:54pm

pumpkinangel wrote:
   Telling them that they can't have it all is giving them a glass ceiling.  </p>

No.  No, it really isn't.

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:38pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Your feelings about gender inequality make this a political issue. </p>

Do you not have feelings on gener inequality?  I can't imagine that anyone doesn't have those issues at some point in their life, especially as a woman.  Would one not prepare their children (both boys and girls) to treat everyone equally?

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:36pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
No glass ceiling garnetboy, i don't treat my daughters differently than my son.

Telling them that they can't have it all is giving them a glass ceiling.  

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:31pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>It's incredible that some can speak for their kids and know what their examples will lead to too, Kinda puts my magic telescope to shame, Sigh. </p>

I agree jam. I find it incredible that parents would tell their kids that they can't have it all because they couldn't accomplish that same dream, to limit a child based on their own reality.


PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:28pm

<<Does your employer give you a paid gym membership?>>

Was that an unusal perk when you were in the working field decades ago?  If so, it's quite common now.  Really, even some companies have gyms on site.  Gym memberships are a good investment for companies that offer health care to their employees.


PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:23pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>OMG, Yes thardy!  If I've raised grounded kids I know I've done something right. </p>

But at what sacrifice?  

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:21pm

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Your earlier post was limiting to just your daughter.  All my kids are raised to follow their dreams and do what they want too, Can they have it all?  Absolutely not.  In returning to school I know I'm compromising things, It's actually been a bit humbling and I'm lucky my kids are the responsible and trustworthy kids I can leave at home while I'm away.  You've limited your cause to just your DD and I won't play that political game, All kids should know that you can have your career + family but don't deny the help that it will require, Likewise SAH, At least IME it's going to require having the means to afford it. </p>

Why on earth can't one have all that they want out of life?  I don't understand limiting kid’s dreams and expectations in life.  I have also taught my boys (and I was taught as well) that you can do anything you want, you may have to work (and work hard) but your life is what yours to make of it as you will.  I personally will not be limiting my kid’s dreams but I am also realistic in that they may have to work darn hard to have it all, as defined by them.

PumpkinAngel

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Registered: 06-27-1998
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 3:10pm

<<And I would never ever EVER have taught my child that failure is something to fear and avoid.  Some of life's richest, most important moments are a direct result of failure.  If you never fail at anything, you haven't actually had a life worth admiring. IMO.>>

I totally agree with your post, especially this point here.  Failure is a chance to learn, grow and is a basic part of life.


PumpkinAngel

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