Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

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Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 11:47am

reginageorge2005 wrote:
Well, you said what I was trying to say far better than me. And AMEN to "If you never fail at anything, you haven't actually had a life worth admiring." I'd rather try something and fail spectacularly, then not try at all. Great lesson for kids!</p>

Ha!  Thanks :)  I was just thinking I could have let YOU respond :)  but I thank you for your kind words :)

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

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Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 11:40am

puss_boo_kay wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">jamblessedthree</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;I'd rather my daughters (AND son) learn that life is about give and take, compromises and sacrifices than to tell them they can have it all....  All of what anyway?  A be all/end all is likely to fail at something.  &lt;/p&gt;</blockquote></p><p>You seem to be taking an excessively literal interpretation of "have it all".  "Have it all" need not mean "CLEAN ALL THE THINGS!!"  (that's a metaphor, in case a reference to cleaning has now confused you--it means all as in "Everything there is to have no matter if you want it or not")  It can and usually does only mean 'have everything the person wants, after all needs are met."</p><p>I can easily and honestly say I have it all.  I have a home I love, a job I like, family I adore and who seem to be fond of me as well, a basement full of antique sewing machines that work beautifully, and 6 stupid, annoying cats who love me for my opposable thumbs and my hot flashes.  What I have is probably not what most people want. Nor what many people even need.  But it doesn't need to be.  Because it's not their life; it's mine.</p><p>I don't think teaching my child that 'having it all' will be different for him than for anyone else is a bad lesson to have taught him.  I don't think he and his wife working together to determine what 'having it all' will mean for them is either unrealistic nor a bad lesson for them to work on together.</p><p>And I would never ever EVER have taught my child that failure is something to fear and avoid.  Some of life's richest, most important moments are a direct result of failure.  If you never fail at anything, you haven't actually had a life worth admiring. IMO.</p>

Well, you said what I was trying to say far better than me. And AMEN to "If you never fail at anything, you haven't actually had a life worth admiring." I'd rather try something and fail spectacularly, then not try at all. Great lesson for kids!

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-20-2013
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 11:37am

 

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I'd rather my daughters (AND son) learn that life is about give and take, compromises and sacrifices than to tell them they can have it all....  All of what anyway?  A be all/end all is likely to fail at something.  </p>
If my daughter has a career she loves, I don't want her to sacrifice that for a family. She shouldn't have to chose between career and family. My sister didn't and is very happy. She will tell you that while she loves her children (and she is a great mother), her maternity leaves were miserable b/c she missed her job. She loves what she does, and she is doing what she always wanted to do. The fact that she is able to support her family doing it is an bonus...she'd do it for far less money just b/c she loves it that much. IMO, that's having it all. For her.IMO, I also have it all, just in another way. SAH was a decision DH and I made because it was in the best interest of our family. And I have loved being home. Truly loved it. But after almost 12 years, with both kids in school FT now, I'd be bored out of my mind SAH if I weren't in grad school. Even with all the volunteer work. And the clean house. I've been doing this parenting thing long enough to understand that sometimes the days are long, but the years are short and while I have plenty of parenting left to do, I'm ready to do something else, too.If my daughter choses to SAH because that's what she wants to do, great. If she choses to work b/c that's what she wants to do, great. I'll likely offer to watch the grandkids for her b/c I know just how quickly those few years fly by. But I want that choice to be HERS. And I don't want her to feel diminished or like she's losing some ridiculous Mommy Olympics because of her choices. And the women's college graduate/feminist in me is completely repulsed by the fact we are still arguing about this in 2013.

On Wednesdays we wear pink.

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 11:20am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I remember meeting a neighbor who told me she "telecommuted", That was 10+ years ago and I had no clue what that meant, Lol.  She traveled SOME but mostly WAH. </p>

Well, that's probably because telecommuting *is* WAH.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 11:18am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>Yes puss, Many moms with minor children are blessed to SAH! </p>

How completely random.  And unnecessary.  As a 52 year old woman, I'm quite well aware that the number of SAHMs blessed with children is at least equal to the number of WOHMs blessed with women.  And I'm perfectly okay with it.  I'm not the one who gets into pearl clutching over the idea of paid employees working from home, or posting on the internet during work hours or any other of the myriad ways in which you have spent years attempting to  shame anyone who disagrees with anything you write.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 02-04-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 11:15am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p>I'd rather my daughters (AND son) learn that life is about give and take, compromises and sacrifices than to tell them they can have it all....  All of what anyway?  A be all/end all is likely to fail at something.  </p>

You seem to be taking an excessively literal interpretation of "have it all".  "Have it all" need not mean "CLEAN ALL THE THINGS!!"  (that's a metaphor, in case a reference to cleaning has now confused you--it means all as in "Everything there is to have no matter if you want it or not")  It can and usually does only mean 'have everything the person wants, after all needs are met."

I can easily and honestly say I have it all.  I have a home I love, a job I like, family I adore and who seem to be fond of me as well, a basement full of antique sewing machines that work beautifully, and 6 stupid, annoying cats who love me for my opposable thumbs and my hot flashes.  What I have is probably not what most people want. Nor what many people even need.  But it doesn't need to be.  Because it's not their life; it's mine.

I don't think teaching my child that 'having it all' will be different for him than for anyone else is a bad lesson to have taught him.  I don't think he and his wife working together to determine what 'having it all' will mean for them is either unrealistic nor a bad lesson for them to work on together.

And I would never ever EVER have taught my child that failure is something to fear and avoid.  Some of life's richest, most important moments are a direct result of failure.  If you never fail at anything, you haven't actually had a life worth admiring. IMO.

************

Kitty

"If you can't annoy somebody with what you write, I think there's little point in writing."-- Kingsley Amis, British novelist, 1971 t .

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:44am

Jams - As WAH with professional skills, why wouldn't I expect the same pay and benefits as someone who goes into an office? My salary and benefits are based on job performance and skills, not the physical location of where I do the work.

Mayer is a new CEO of a company on the verge of collapse. Yahoo is not going to survive unless it totally reinvents itself. My company, OTOH, is successful and does not need a drastic makeover, though it does react to market pressures and workforce changes, though most changes involve outsourcing software development to cheaper geos.

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:42am
No, I don't teach online classes. Zero interest.
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:39am
I bet she's got a posh office with the finest of everything, She makes the bucks to have it too.

 


 


iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 10:34am

I'd rather my daughters (AND son) learn that life is about give and take, compromises and sacrifices than to tell them they can have it all....  All of what anyway?  A be all/end all is likely to fail at something.  

 


 


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