Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
350
Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

Pages

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:52pm
Who says "having it all" equals perfection? That's nonsense. And even at five, my kids were quite aware they didn't get everything they wanted whenever they wanted it. Even trying to give a kid that is socially irresponsible in my view.
Avatar for jamblessedthree
iVillage Member
Registered: 10-23-2001
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 7:53pm

I need to get used to this new format, But I'll try copying and quoting.....

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:03pm

bordwithyou wrote:
   If "teaching others" while in pursuit of a degree in the humanities is "too much of distraction," perhaps one ought to consider a different career.....

Me:  Ooh, bad advice.  I know of 2 PhD grads who found teaching students to whom English was a second language onerous.  Obviously, they didn't consider a different career which would be insane just because their teaching responsibilities were distracting.

Quote:
One should also not be paying for an advanced degree in the humanities.  If someone isn't paying you to get it, something is wrong. 

Me:  Ooh, wrong again.  It's 2013.  People pay for law school themselves.  People pay for PhDs in many humanities because they are not being asked to publish, a professor doesn't need another grad student doing research, etc.  Lots of students have to pay.  I never heard of advising someone NOT to pursue his dream of getting a PhD.  I thought that was your thing too ~ your ambitious while others might not be, you pursue your goals and can't envision life any other way even if the goals won't be met.

In this instance, advising someone not to pursue his dream of getting a PhD strikes me as odd.  These days and in this job market, more than before, some students will have to pay for their advanced degrees themselves.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:15pm

<In this instance, advising someone not to pursue his dream of getting a PhD strikes me as odd.  These days and in this job market, more than before, some students will have to pay for their advanced degrees themselves.>

Who can pay for advanced degrees by themselves? 300K or more for most advanced degrees?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:18pm

reginageorge2005 wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">thardy2001</em> wrote:</div>&lt;p&gt;&lt;blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"&gt;&lt;div class="quote-author"&gt;&lt;em class="placeholder"&gt;bordwithyou&lt;/em&gt; wrote:&lt;/div&gt;  I'm not quite sure what you are asking.  We are prepared to pay for our children's undergraduate college wherever they decide to go.  We are not prepared to pay for graduate school, because it's my belief that if you can't get a tuition waiver and an assistantship for a PhD program, you shouldn't be in it. &amp;lt;/p&amp;gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;I was curious about your definition of having it all, since you mention applauding kids' ambitions, in the middle of a discussion about "having it all."  &lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;I think it's hollow to tell a child he or she can have it all, and at the same time not set aside the tuition, R&amp;amp;B for a postbaccalaureate degree or 2 even in the humanities or when teaching others would be too much of a distraction. You disagree.  And you will tell your children they can have it all?

reginageorge2005 wrote:
  Yes, because clearly if you can't afford multiple degrees for your kids, you are a horrible parent. So you're going to fall back on your usual pattern of condescension and economic superiority instead of actually debating the issue at hand? Classic. But I'm going to agree with the academic, who actually has a Ph.D and experience in the field, and her assertation that if you're a candidate who can't get a tuition waiver and assistantship, you shouldn't be in the program. And if you can only handle the program and nothing else, again, I'm going hazard a guess that you shouldn't be in the program. My professor this semester is teaching three graduate level courses, leading an extracurricular course and finishing his book. All while applying for a tenure-track position at the uni (he's currently "visiting") and all of the interviews, presentations, etc involved with that. IOW, he's got a lot going on. In addition to his young family. If he couldn't juggle an assistantship with his studies, he couldn't manage the balancing act he's got going on now. And I know he did that b/c I've seen his CV...

Is it really condescending and "economically superior" to save money for college and an advanced degree?  So many in America are doing the same.  The other part about stomping on a person's ambitions to get a Masters or PhD ~ that's completely foreign to me.  I don't see reconciling the suppression of a child's ambitions  in education with your notion of telling a child she can have it all.  Can you explain?

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:25pm

bordwithyou wrote:
  Did you think that telling your kids that they can achieve their dreams means handing them those things on a silver platter?  How odd.  My job as a parent entails helping them define their dreams, pointing them in the right direction, and giving them the best start in life we can so that they have the tools to achieve their dreams.</p>

I value education.  I know you do too.  Is ensuring they don't graduate from college and a PhD program $300,000+ in debt, for example, handing them things on a "silver platter?"  I'm finding it very difficult reconciling your ensuring your children they can "have it all," encouraging them to pursue their goals and ambitions with telling them they should drop out of a PhD program.  And not doing more than ensuring heavy debt upon graduation from the same level of education you have ~ the PhD.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:28pm

reginageorge2005 wrote:
  How do you know that someone on here can't afford expensive private college and a Ph.D? I attended an expensive private college courtesy of scholarships. It was actually cheaper for me to attend the "expensive private college" than it would have been for me to attend a state school. The private school had a strong endowment and smaller pool of applicants. Which meant more $$$ for financial aid for me. One of my sorority sisters was awarded a merit scholarship on the basis of her grades. She didn't need the financial aid, so her dad gave her the cash he saved on her tuition.</p><p>Right now DD wants to be a vet. Whether she actually goes through with it or not, IDK. She's five. But if that's she still wants to do in 12 years, DH and I will support her. I just don't get the idea of telling your kid they can't do something b/c you don't think it is reasonable. Do you think Virginia Clinton thought her son was going to grow up to be the President? Look at Clinton's upbringing--that was a long shot, to say the least. But he did it. I am not going to kick my kid or deflate their dreams. And if the world does it, I will be here for them to pick up the pieces.

Much like Puss BouQuet, you have me confused with someone else here who said she will not be paying beyond college tuition.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:32pm

reginageorge2005 wrote:
   I asked about men "having it all" a few pages ago. Lauren addressed it. T &amp; Jam conveniently ignored it. I'm always very curious about that...

I answered that awhile ago.

iVillage Member
Registered: 05-13-2009
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:32pm

< it really condescending and "economically superior" to save money for college and an advanced degree?  So many in America are doing the same. >

Can you provide some stats on that? Because from what I've seen, few parents are in a position to save but a fraction of college costs...but enlighten us all.

iVillage Member
Registered: 09-01-2002
Thu, 02-28-2013 - 8:35pm

bordwithyou wrote:
Well, Thardy, it looks like I didn't have enough time home with my children to satisfy YOU. But I had enough to satisfy ME. And since I am living my life, and you are living yours, that's just fine and dandy.

It's not about you, it's what's best in SAH for the kids.  Rushing back to work, it's not enough time for the baby.  Stay at-home too long and one loses traction in her career.  No one can have it all.  Not men, not women.

Pages