Marissa Mayer Bans WAH

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Registered: 09-01-2002
Marissa Mayer Bans WAH
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Sun, 02-24-2013 - 1:08pm

The youngest female Fortune 500 CEO ~ Yahoo's Marissa Mayer ~ banned WAH for all employees, including full-time customer service reps, those who WAH just 1 or 2 days/week, even those hired on the condition they WAH.

<<"Speed and quality are often sacrificed when we work from home," says the memo from HR director Jackie Rees..."We need to be one Yahoo!, and that starts with physically being together.>>

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-belkin/marissa-mayer-work-from-home-yahoo-rule_b_2750256.html

Apparently the fact that all of the "tools" can be at home, accessing the main offices remotely, is not enough.

Wouldn't we expect a new mom especially to "champion" combining work and family?  Some WAH employees say they get more done at home, due to a shorter "commute", fewer interuptions at the watercooler and cubicle.  For those who WAH part-time or f-t, are you as/more productive at home as in an office?  Will this backfire as the top talent can WAH for Yahoo and other companies? 

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Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 4:45am
Further to humanities PhDs, it is a kind of teacher training. I have absolutely no patience with PhD candidates (or actual PhDs) who get the vapors if they have to teach. Some of the most brilliant professors I have known have also been the kindest, most generous and most patient teachers I have known.
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Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 6:53am
Jams, What is a "fancy undergraduate degree?"
Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 7:32am

Having a friend that's still very involved in her sorority all these years later I hear a lot of the ins and outs, My friend's daughter is now a legacy of hers.  What I find sort of odd however is that she's never used her degree, She works retail and while there's nothing wrong with that I wonder what model she is for those girls pushing through classes and programs to succeed in school.  Please tell me there's more to sorority than the poliitcal/I am woman hear me roar component.  Thanks. 

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 7:39am

bordwithyou wrote:
Jams, What is a "fancy undergraduate degree?"

That's all you pulled from that post to debate?  Gee, Lol.  You tell me Bord.  You've said many times you've got all these resources and the ability to pay for things others can't.  I call that fancy, It's also a fascade for some. 

 

 

iVillage Member
Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 7:46am
Jams, I don't like to debate without knowing the meaning of terms people are using. I have no idea what a "fancy" degree is as opposed to a "plain" one, and you are the one who used the term. You think it's "fancy" that we bothered to save up for our kids' college education? I don't see anything to debate in the fact that you have this opinion that saving up for college = fancy.
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Registered: 05-13-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 7:47am

jamblessedthree wrote:
<p><blockquote class="quote-msg quote-nest-1 odd"><div class="quote-author"><em class="placeholder">bordwithyou</em> wrote:</div>Jams, What is a "fancy undergraduate degree?"</blockquote></p><p>That's all you pulled from that post to debate?  Gee, Lol.  You tell me Bord.  You've said many times you've got all these resources and the ability to pay for things others can't.  I call that fancy, It's also a fascade for some. </p>

Bord has made it a priority to save for college education - nothing fancy about that, it was a financial choice, just like the choice to sah. My husband and I made the same choice.

What is a fascade?

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Registered: 01-08-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 7:52am
Jams, a lot of people get their undergraduate degree not as a career move, but because they want the education. They "use" the degree by using the critical thinking skills, the enriched understanding one's heritage, cultures, and place in the universe in making daily decisions. An undergraduate education is not necessarily something that you get to make $$$. For some, it's a quality of life issue. A graduate degree is more of a vocational/professional investment.
Avatar for rollmops2009
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Registered: 02-24-2009
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 8:01am
"Please tell me there's more to sorority than the poliitcal/I am woman hear me roar component." Sororities as hotbeds of militant feminism. I think this is a first, lol. As for "using" an undergraduate degree, that is quite irrelevant to me. You go to college to learn how to think, read and write, to become a bit more cultivated (hopefully), come in contact with people and ideas that you might not otherwise trip over and so on. An undergrad degree is also the admission card to grad school, where you can learn a marketable skill. So saying someone doesn't "use" her undergrad degree is to me similar to saying that someone doesn't "use" her kindergarten education. It is a foundation, not an end point.
Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 8:11am

bordwithyou wrote:
Jams, I don't like to debate without knowing the meaning of terms people are using. I have no idea what a "fancy" degree is as opposed to a "plain" one, and you are the one who used the term. You think it's "fancy" that we bothered to save up for our kids' college education? I don't see anything to debate in the fact that you have this opinion that saving up for college = fancy.

Or you could call it what it is without the quips about what abilities you have compared to others, Which you really don't know. 

 

 

Avatar for jamblessedthree
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Registered: 10-23-2001
Fri, 03-01-2013 - 8:18am

Erased, I'll come back to this later...

 

 

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